View Full Submission View Parent Comment
0 users agree
10:06 PM, Tuesday March 21st 2023

I think what might be happening here is that the sides of the box are very rectangular (rather than square).

If you draw a box that has square ends, then if you turn the box so the ellipse faces you directly, you'll be looking at a circle inside of a square. As you turn that plane in space, the circle will turn into an ellipse. The minor axis will cut it in half as you expect. (Like you see here: https://www.carbodydesign.com/tutorial/13560/drawing-car-wheels-in-perspective/ )

However, if you have a box with rectangular ends (like a cereal box or a book), you would have to draw an oval (not a circle) inside it to touch all the edges of the rectangle. As the plane of the box with an oval drawn on it turns in space, it doesn't obey the rules of a circle turning in space. There won't be a minor axis cutting it in half. I think that's what you have going on.

It's hard to draw a perfect square in perspective, but I think the goal is to get close-ish here. Close enough that the ellipse is somewhat convincing. Maybe it's easier to start with the ellipses for a few, and draw the boxes around them until you get a feel for it?

2:48 AM, Wednesday March 22nd 2023

Mmh, that might be the case!! Gotta check Thanks!!

The recommendation below is an advertisement. Most of the links here are part of Amazon's affiliate program (unless otherwise stated), which helps support this website. It's also more than that - it's a hand-picked recommendation of something we've used ourselves, or know to be of impeccable quality. If you're interested, here is a full list.
PureRef

PureRef

This is another one of those things that aren't sold through Amazon, so I don't get a commission on it - but it's just too good to leave out. PureRef is a fantastic piece of software that is both Windows and Mac compatible. It's used for collecting reference and compiling them into a moodboard. You can move them around freely, have them automatically arranged, zoom in/out and even scale/flip/rotate images as you please. If needed, you can also add little text notes.

When starting on a project, I'll often open it up and start dragging reference images off the internet onto the board. When I'm done, I'll save out a '.pur' file, which embeds all the images. They can get pretty big, but are way more convenient than hauling around folders full of separate images.

Did I mention you can get it for free? The developer allows you to pay whatever amount you want for it. They recommend $5, but they'll allow you to take it for nothing. Really though, with software this versatile and polished, you really should throw them a few bucks if you pick it up. It's more than worth it.

This website uses cookies. You can read more about what we do with them, read our privacy policy.