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11:42 PM, Friday October 22nd 2021

Hi there. I'll be handling your box challenge critique.

Not only does the challenge help deepen your understanding of important concepts but it shows your desire to learn as well. Be proud of what you've accomplished and that desire you've shown. That being said I'll try to keep this critique fairly brief so you can get working on the next steps as soon as possible.

Things you did well:

  • You're mostly keeping your lines smooth and confidently drawn.

  • When hatching you're keeping your lines mostly evenly spaced which helps things appear solid and tidy. There is some wobbling occurring which is a sign that you may be hesitatig a bit. Remember that line confidence is our top priority and accuracy will improve with mileage.

  • It's good to see that you're experimenting with orientations and proportions. Experimenting is how we form a more well rounded understanding of the concepts we're trying to learn. Without experimenting we risk only improving at drawing in one particular way. This is a great habit to build and I hope you continue to demonstrate it in the future as well.

Things you can work on:

-There's room for you to experiment with rates of foreshortening more. Currently you keep your vanishing points far from your boxes and try to make your lines as parallel as you can. Try moving your vanishing points closer to see how your lines will begin to converge more dramatically.

  • Quite frequently you're imagining our vanishing points between the viewer and your box. This causes you to extend your lines in the wrong direction which leads to your lines diverging from the actual vanishing point. Here's a guide I wrote that will hopefully help you know how to place your vanishing points and extension lines consistently.

  • There are times when your lines converge in pairs or you attempt to keep your lines a bit too parallel which results in them diverging. This is an example of lines converging in pairs, and this shows the relation between each line in a set and their respective vanishing point. The inner pair of lines will be quite similar unless the box gets quite long and the outer pair can vary a lot depending on the location of the vanishing point. Move it further away and the lines become closer to parallel while moving it closer increases the rate of foreshortening.

The key things we want to remember from this exercise are that our lines should always converge as a set not in pairs, never diverge from the vanishing point and due to perspective they won't be completely parallel.

I won't be moving you on to the next lesson just yet, each lesson builds off concepts in the previous course material so if you move forward with un-addressed issues you end up just creating further issues on top of them.

I'd like you to draw 25 more boxes. Do your best to experiment with rates of foreshortening as well as try to get your lines to converge consistently towards a vanishing point rather than diverging from it.

Once you've completed your boxes reply to this critique with a link to them, I'll address anything that needs to be worked on and once you've shown you're ready I'll move you on to the next lesson.

I know you can do this and look forward to seeing your work.

Next Steps:

Draw 25 more boxes please.

When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
1:33 AM, Tuesday October 26th 2021

https://imgur.com/a/kQMWJka

Thank you for the critique! I tried to focus on the vanishing points and used different foreshortening.

12:22 AM, Thursday October 28th 2021

There's still work to do but you're on the right track.

Your lines still tend to converge in pairs and get a bit too parallel at times but I have no doubt you will continue to improve with more mileage so I have no problem marking your submission complete and moving you on to the next lesson.

Keep practicing previous exercises and boxes as warm ups and good luck in lesson 2.

Next Steps:

Move on to lesson 2.

This critique marks this lesson as complete.
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