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2 users agree
1:25 AM, Monday May 17th 2021

Hi Cypher0814, congratulations on finishing lesson 2 !

Your arrows look pretty good. I would try applying more aggressive perspective though, try using foreshortening and compressing the space in the farther end of the arrow to get a more 3D feeling on it.

Your organic forms with contour lines are perfectly done! Just keep in mind that you don't really need to draw so many contour lines on the forms, you just need enough to describe how the object turns in 3D space.

The texture analysis exercise also looks good, just try filling more of the space that you left blank with the deeper shadows that would only be noticeable there. Dissections are alo very well done. Don't be afraid to break the silhouettes more with your textures though, that will help greatly in highlighting the texture you are using.

Good job on your form intersections, nothing to comment on those.

On your first organic intersection exercise you are using way to many shadows, you seem to have corrected that on the second one, so good job there. Your shadows also seem to be sticking to the forms that cast them and not to the ones the are being casted on to (https://drawabox.com/lesson/2/9/shadows). Try to project your shadows onto the underlying form. Also, as I mentioned before, you don't really need that many contour lines to describe the forms. I would say you only need about half the ones you are currently using. Try to only draw the few ones you need to actually describe the form.

Overall you did an excelent job ! Just keep in mind these tips for when you practice these exercises as warm ups. I think you are ready to move on to lesson 3.

Good luck !

Next Steps:

Lesson 3

This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
7:46 AM, Tuesday May 18th 2021

Thank you so much for your feedback. I'll make sure to remind myself of the tips you've given to me for the following lessons.

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