Lesson 2: Contour Lines, Texture and Construction

11:27 PM, Tuesday February 28th 2023

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Some are messy but I think I am starting to understand

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3:11 PM, Tuesday March 7th 2023
edited at 3:12 PM, Mar 7th 2023

Congrats on your completion of Lesson 2! now, i must premise here: There are alot of mistakes that you have to fix, and i also congratulate you for posting this. Some would find it embarrassing. I would recommend that you join the discord drawabox community and attempt to get more feedback there!

Organic arrows: I observe some good cases of compressing the farther end of the arrow and also hatching at the right sides correctly, Nice!

Although, there are many issues i've found. Starting with repeated wobbly lines; You must avoid chicken scratching or doing lines per segment. And definitely, avoid repeating lines. Lines must remain as ONE SINGULAR STROKE. My suggestion is to take some more time to plan and think how your mark will go, like explain in the ghosted lines exercise:

https://drawabox.com/lesson/1/10/planning

This repeated-wobbly lines problem is something i see throughout the entire submission, either with inaccurate lines that you tried to fix with another lines, so this applies to the other exercises you did.

Now, in terms of hatching, i'm gonna have to say it, they look like scribbles. Hatching is the act of making multiple, but still, PLANNED lines confidently. And (in some cases) fraying only on one end. try to get out of the habit of scribbling, as i see you do this alot here, and start making separate strokes, like said here: https://drawabox.com/lesson/1/3/consistent

Organic forms: I see a great execution of shapes, making sure wit

In the contour cuvres one

Texture analysis: I notice a decent transition But i think you did the exercise in the wrong orientation (doing 4 textures instead of 3?) and alot of cases of scribbling which is another major mistake. Like how comfy said: Don't rely on randomness and chaos!https://drawabox.com/lesson/2/6/scribbling

In particular, you should do your texture analysis exercise in horizontal because it gives you space for a better gradient texture.

Dissections: Same mistakes as before, but seems pretty solid in terms of wrapping your textures around with some failed instances, great!

Form intersections: Good job in maintaining the shapes realtively equilateral and shallow, but, i dont see the marks of the intersections! and also, spheres don't quite need contour curves: just one ellipse that points on the right direction

Organic intersections: The first page feels much more balanced and solid than the others, which i congra e props to you! Again like in organic forms, you don't hook your contour lines, which is considered a mistake. Also, i don't recommend you pile too much sausages, because in the real world and having alot of them wouldn't look too vertical. Also, stay away from too long / elongated forms.

Also, useful to avoid big shadows looking messy, this image can help you out

Some suggestions!

  • I'm guessing that while you did get feedback on your issues, the problem may not be just your failure to follow instructions; your issue is that you never went back to practice them more often (Which, when you're done with an exercise, it doesn't mean you're done with it- you'll have to do it again and again forever, to sharpen your drawing skills)

Try to keep ALL of your exercises in INK using a fineliner 0.5mm (maybe it could be lighting, but alot of instances look like were make in pencil, just wanted to point out).

If you'd like, you can keep in touch through Discord, my tag is Ferventinel#4405

Next Steps:

2 pages of organic arrows -Make sure that your farther end always compresses-

2 pages of organic forms (one w/ contour curves and the other contour ellipses)

4 pages of form intersections (first one being boxes like before)

If you don't know whether you can or cannot do confident lines, you can pratice by warming up with free flowing lines like shown in this video

When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
edited at 3:12 PM, Mar 7th 2023
7:59 PM, Tuesday April 4th 2023

Thanks for the critique! Now I see it clearer, I still practicing and struggling mostly bc those were the first times, I am trying to ghost more my lines, I will practice the ghosting lines more since my pulse is kind of weak and my hand trembles sometimes.

https://imgur.com/a/RIqtBF9

The exercises are all in ink as you say, I used a pen since fineliners are kind of expensive here where I come from.

9:45 PM, Wednesday April 12th 2023

While it is important to maintain equilateral shapes on the form intersections, you forgot again to mark your intersections!! Also, if possible try to hatch making individual confident lines and avoid scribble, because it makes thing messy.

I think you're okay right now, but it is utmost essential that you try to perfect these exercises (doing them as warm ups) and try to follow their instructions. If you don't the future exercises will become more harder than needed!

Next Steps:

Feel free to move onto lesson 3

This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
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