What is the average wait time for community critiques?

3:37 PM, Wednesday July 8th 2020

I feel totally impatient for asking a question like this, but I just want to make sure my experience is to be expected. When I submitted my Lesson 1 homework, I happened to get a critique for it that night (within minutes of posting it I think!). I'm pretty sure I lucked out hard with that. However, I submitted my 250 box challenge almost two weeks ago with no response. I've been critiquing other lesson 1s in hopes to be moved up in the queue, but so far I got no results from that.

Will my submission get seen eventually? If so, will it take a few weeks more? That's totally fine, I would just like to know. Or is there a possibility that my homework is buried in the queue forever and would benefit from being removed and reposted?

Thank you for your time!

Cheers,

Jac

1 users agree
7:11 PM, Wednesday July 8th 2020

Hello! I think it's a fair question. I'm getting to the 250 boxes challenge today, and when I'm done with it, I might take a few minutes to look at yours and offer feedback. (Would appreciate it if you did the same for me). But basically, that's how it works, there is no average wait time because it's free and depends on other people's free time.

Have a great day!

1:30 AM, Thursday July 9th 2020
edited at 1:47 AM, Jul 9th 2020

Thank you for your response! I'm glad I'm not the only one experiencing this. I may give you my feedback on the 250 box challenge, although I'd feel more comfortable critiquing lessons I've already "passed"!

...there is no average wait time because...

As a math tutor, I feel like I should say this: there is an average wait time. There has to be. "Wait time" is a quantity we can measure for every submission that's been critiqued. Theoretically if you added all of those quantities and divided by the total number of critiqued submissions, you would get... the average. But just because we know that value exists doesn't mean we know what it is, or that we can even estimate it (easily). So I totally believe that there is no available info on the average wait time, but the gods of statistics... they know.

Cheers,

Jac

edited at 1:47 AM, Jul 9th 2020
0 users agree
7:40 PM, Wednesday July 8th 2020
edited at 7:48 PM, Jul 8th 2020

I also have these same doubts. It's been a few days since I finished the 250 box challenge, and it's notable that there is a time difference in how quickly I receive the critique of lesson 1 and of this challenge. I'm waiting the critique of this challenge as well, and I'm in doubt if there is a possibility that my homework would get lost in the feed (I'm not hurried to receive the critique, but it's just a doubt that I have lol). I would offer my criticism to you, but I think it is interesting to have someone who has already been criticized in this challenge and is at least one lesson ahead to be able to criticize you. Anyway, I will also be waiting for an answer.

edited at 7:48 PM, Jul 8th 2020
1 users agree
11:21 PM, Tuesday July 14th 2020

What people see on the first page are the most recent posts. Yours might have disappeared behind all the new ones. Honestly, I think paying for the official critiques is really worth it, because they really make a complete usefull feedback. You can search the submitted homeworks and filter to see homeworks that have been corrected by official critique. You can learn from them and judge if you pass. You can also see what you should improve on.

0 users agree
7:24 PM, Wednesday July 8th 2020

Your submission is there, eventually someone will get to it, even if it takes a few weeks. I try to critique submissions in order (lesson 1 > box challenge > lesson 2 > lesson 3 etc) to encourage people to critique other lower lessons, so like you've been doing if you critique lesson 1s you'll get more chances to get critiques. Uncomfortable also included a new system that makes your submission get higher in the queue depending on the agrees you recieve in your critiques, so doing critiques will help you even more because of that.

8:07 PM, Wednesday July 8th 2020

Good to know! This clarifies things. Thank you (and hanamiroyui and jordanasza) for your responses.

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