How can I improve if I am too impatient?

3:40 PM, Sunday June 26th 2022

I am good at understanding the concepts of the lessons, 3D space, etc. I also reread the sections.

I even take my time drawing on the 50/50 rule.

But, geez. When it comes to making drawings it's like I can't be more delicate or plan elaborately.

As if by instinct my brain takes the first thing it can do and doesn't think about the rest.

Several reviews have already mentioned that I don't seem to plan each drawing very much. I put a lot of effort into it; but it's as if my hand can't wait too long when I want to draw something.

What do you think I could do to be more patient and plan better?

16 users agree
1:41 AM, Monday June 27th 2022

Patience is, like everything else, a learned skill. You develop it one step at a time - but it requires you to take active control of your choices. That means recognizing the fact that the things we do, even the subtlest, most automatic habits are the results of choices we make. Either choices to take control of what we're doing, or choices to let go of that control and simply let things happen.

It won't be instantaneous, but the more you catch yourself giving up that control, and then reassert it as a result, the more in control you'll become, and the better you'll be able to control your base urges and tendencies. From there, you'll find it easier to be "patient".

2:59 PM, Wednesday June 29th 2022

That's great advice, I'll try to take more control of my decisions, then.

Thanks comfy!

0 users agree
11:18 AM, Friday July 1st 2022

Don't focus on every detail. You will get used to drawing over time, and this will in turn help you at getting better at seeing and adding details.

Try speed drawing stuff, like setting a timer to 5 minutes to draw anything, then do it again and again.

2:50 PM, Friday July 1st 2022

What you recommend sounds very interesting!

Let's say I do the practice with the timer, will it be better with references or drawing from imagination?

4:56 PM, Friday July 1st 2022

You have to use reference for the timed challenge, so I would recommend something with an okay difficulty to draw like a big bird or animal with recognizable features like a mouse or cat.

1:56 PM, Saturday July 2nd 2022

Thanks for the advice!

0 users agree
12:53 AM, Tuesday July 5th 2022

I struggle with impatience, too, both with myself and with the process. I've found that it helps me to know when to set a drawing down, and only to start drawing when I have a good long time to spend on it without any particular hurry.

Setting a timer is also a good idea, either to limit yourself to 5 minutes so you have to use that time efficiently, or setting it for say, half an hour, and knowing you have to use all that time on a very simple exercise.

I'm a little guilty of multitasking ; I'll put on an audiobook so that my ADHD brain can give the excess energy to listening instead of trying to hurry. I don't know if this is great for learning, but it's let me stick to my exercises and do them at a slower pace than I might've otherwise.

12:06 PM, Tuesday July 5th 2022

Thanks for sharing your experience!

I also suppose it would be a bit useful to leave something playing in the background....

I'll try to be more precise with the time I get around to drawing.

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