goodboy123

Tamer of Beasts

Joined 10 months ago

12075 Reputation

goodboy123's Sketchbook

  • Tamer of Beasts
  • The Fearless
  • Giver of Life
  • Dimensional Dominator
  • The Relentless
  • Basics Brawler
  • Sharing the Knowledge
    0 users agree
    9:16 AM, Tuesday May 25th 2021

    Hello again Kap, congrats on finishing lesson 4! I'll be looking over your work.

    Also I know we talked about a couple of your constructions on the discord channel so I'll try to be brief when talking about them.

    Starting with your organic forms with contour lines, you generally sticked to the characteristics of simple sausages which is great. However with your contour lines, you usually drew them pretty flat and kept the degrees of them the same. Remember that just like the branches, varying the degrees of your contour curves really helps sell the illusion of depth. Also when drawing the contour curves, try to think about the volume and the shape of the form you're drawing them on.

    Moving onto your constructions, you honestly did a great job here. I'll try to point out any mistakes I see without being too nitpicky though.

    • You generally tried to work additively as much as possible, starting from simple forms and adding new forms on top of them in order to create your constructions. You occasionally deviated from this method though. Instead of adding forms to an underlying construction, you instead tried to draw the entire form in a single go (the front and the back legs of your grasshopper and the claws of your lobster, for example). I'm going over this again because this is an incredibly important part of lesson 5. You'll start to realize this with your animal constructions as well but I'll mention it anyways: When drawing your organic constructions, the forms you're adding to the initial construction should almost feel like piles of clay that you're adding to a 3D gesture that you've created (with sausages, spheres, whatever). This is a very powerful approach in my opinion because this way, you will start to think deeper about how each individual form wraps around each other (like on this dog leg demo, for example), which is the main part of most of these construction lessons.

    • You did a really good job with your cast shadows and I'm really happy to see that after pointing it out on your lesson 3 critique, you managed to limit your use of shading only to show how each form relates to each other. Not only this helps make your constructions look more convincing, it also saves your overhead view constructions from looking 2D (like on your bee construction). However, on two constructions, I'm seeing that you colored in the little spots on the abdomen of your insects (this one and this one, to be precise). I think this was mentioned on discord as well but although they don't look too distracting here, these have the potential to flatten out the entire construction so try to avoid coloring in to show the actual color of your refs. (If you look at the comments of the tiger head demo video, you'll see that Uncomfy admits that coloring in wasn't a part of the lesson and should've been avoided)

    I don't think I have anything else to add! I'm sorry if this critique was rather weak. Even though I tried to make as many pointers as possible, I didn't want to overwhelm you by going over the same mistakes we talked about on the discord server.

    Also I know you completed this lesson quickly because you had a lot of free time but with your animal constructions, try to really take your time with each page and observer your references closely. This actually came up in your lobster construction as well. If you look at the scales on the tail of your construction, you'll notice that they kinda look like sausages instead of scales. This is mainly because you weren't fully paying attention to the silhouette of the tail on your reference. This is obviously not a big issue but I just though I'd give an example.

    Overall, you did a great job with the lesson so I'll go ahead and mark this as complete. Good luck with lesson 5!

    Next Steps:

    Move on to lesson 5.

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete. In order for the student to receive their completion badge, this critique will need 2 agreements from other members of the community.
    10:03 PM, Saturday May 22nd 2021

    You're welcome, I enjoyed writing the critique as well!

    I'm very glad I was able to convince you to keep getting critiques. It's completely natural for us to make mistakes and I'm very happy to see that chose to accept your mistakes and started to work on them.

    Working through these mistakes will definitely take time (I still have some issues with the mistakes I pointed out on the critique, for example) but the important thing is that you'll gradually get better as you keep practicing. So keep at it, good luck!

    9:35 PM, Saturday May 22nd 2021

    Thank you so much for this incredibly detailed critique weijak! It was very helpful.

    On my first 150 cylinders, I actually forgot to try out 3pp cylinders haha. Glad you pointed it out though! I'll try to experiment more in the future.

    And you're completely right about how taking risks would be helpful and how worrying about the end result shouldn't be a concern. It almost seems like "playing it safe" has been wired into my subconscious. However, I've been working on this these two issues throughout the curriculum and I'll definitely do my best to step out of my comfort zone for the last two lessons.

    Also trying to make sure that the size and the degree shifts of the ellipses were similar to each other was probably something I wasn't consciously thinking about at the beginning. Over time I tried to pay more attention to it though. Now that you've mentioned it, it'll definitely be on my mind in the future.

    Thanks again for taking the time to review my work, I really appreciate it.

    2 users agree
    11:43 AM, Friday May 21st 2021

    Hello Daijoum, congrats on finishing lesson one! I'll be looking over your submission.

    Starting with your lines, you did a pretty good job here. Especially with the superimposed lines exercise, it seems that you were prioritizing confidence as much as you could. However your lines tend to get pretty wobbly with the ghosted planes/lines exercises. This implies that you were probably focusing too hard on accuracy and therefore were a bit hesitant while putting down your lines. Always remember that, especially for this lesson, confidence should always be your main goal. If you do your best to draw confidently, your lines are bound to get more accurate with time as well. This won't happen overnight though, so don't get frustrated if you aren't happy with your results now. Just keep practicing and with time, I'm sure you'll give rulers a run for their money :) Also, you can take a look at this comment by Uncomfortable if you wish to read more about ghosting and hesitation.

    Your ellipses look pretty good! You generally drew confidently and you didn't forget to draw through them. You did a good job with keeping your ellipses within their bounds as well. You have a couple of slightly deformed ellipses but I'm sure your ellipses will get cleaner as you keep practicing. There are a couple of misaligned ellipses in the funnels exercise but that's not a big deal for now.

    You did a really good job with your perspective exercises. Also your line quality seems to have improved in the rough perspective exercise as well which is great.

    On the rotated boxes exercise, you did a good job with keeping your boxes close and using the neighboring edges to construct the next box. Using hatching definitely would've helped make the image more readable though. Also I'm seeing that you occasionally drew over your lines to correct them. Remember that trying to correct your lines with ink will only shift the viewers attention to your mistakes.

    Lastly, on organic perspective, you did a pretty solid job as well. You have some diverging lines but you'll have a lot of time to work on that during the 250 Boxes Challenge.

    I don't think I have anything else to add! Overall, you did great with this lesson, congratulations! I'm going to mark this lesson as complete so here are some helpful links for the box challenge: an alternate method for placing the inner corner, different orientations of boxes. That last link is for inspiration only, make sure to draw from your imagination.

    Good luck!

    Next Steps:

    Move on to the 250 boxes challenge. Make sure to use some of the exercises from this lesson as a warmup later on.

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    8:06 PM, Wednesday May 19th 2021

    Hello again! These look great, good job! I know you drew these before posting your homework here so I won't add anything to my critique, hope that's okay! I'll mark your submission as complete, good luck ahead :)

    Next Steps:

    Move on to lesson 4!

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    2 users agree
    5:15 PM, Wednesday May 19th 2021

    Hello there Kap, congrats on making it through! I'll be looking over your submission.

    Starting with your arrows, you did a pretty good job with drawing with confidence and accuracy, with your regular lines and with your line weight. You also did a good job with making your arrows flow through the scene fluidly but don't forget to compress the further end of your arrows to create a better illusion of depth.

    Onto your leaves, like your arrows, you managed to draw in a way that your leaves sit and flow through space really fluidly. You experimented with more complex structures as well. You generally did a good job with respecting the initial construction when adding edge detail but on a couple of leaves, instead of adding forms to/carving into the leaf with individual strokes (like shown here) you tried adding the detail to the entire edge in a single stroke. This will come up in the future as well so I recommend revisiting this part of lesson 1.

    Your branches look pretty solid as well. Every line seems to tapper almost perfectly to the next and the transition between each segment is pretty smooth. However on some of your branches, instead of extending your lines to the half point of the next segment, you stopped right past the ellipses. Also remember to vary the degrees of your ellipses to create a more solid illusion of depth (like here).

    Onto your constructions, they seem pretty good! You're building in stages, using the methods introduced in this lesson and creating convincing constructions while drawing as big as you can. Here's some pointers to help you moving forward:

    • First thing that I'd like to draw your attention to is your use of shading. Although you generally did a good job with using cast shadows to show how forms relate to each other, sometimes you instead used shading to make you constructions look better (the little dots on the branch of your rose construction, for example). I know it can be easy to forget the difference between those two but the main thing I'd like you to remember is that we're using shadows only to show the relation between forms, not to create a pretty picture. You can take a look at this part of lesson 2 for a better explanation.

    • Also on the topic of cast shadows, you occasionally drew shapes instead of shadows (like on your mushroom construction ). Take a look at this demo to see the difference between those two.

    • I'm sorry for repeating myself but try to always pay attention to the degrees of your ellipses. They occasionally break the illusion even though your actual constructions are very convincing.

    • Because you skipped line weight/cast shadows on this construction, it looks really cluttered. I feel like you rushed that one since your use of line weight on other constructions is really good.

    I don't think I have anything to add. Your constructions were pretty solid, keep it up! (I was especially impressed with your rose). Even though I would love to let you move on, I'm going to need you to upload one construction (because of the construction I mentioned right above). You can add detail if you want. You can use a simple reference as well, I only want you to take your time with it! Try to work on the stuff I pointed out here, good luck!

    If you have any questions, feel free to ask me here or on discord :)

    Next Steps:

    Please submit one plant construction.

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    2 users agree
    2:47 PM, Tuesday May 18th 2021

    Hello there, congrats on finishing the lesson! I'll be looking over your work.

    Starting with your sausages, it seems that you were trying to stick to the characteristics of a simple sausage but you're not fully there yet. Remember that your sausages should be two equal spheres connected by a tube of consistent width . You occasionally had some issues with placing your ellipses/contours inside the sausage. Try to ghost through each line until you're comfortable with where that line sits on the paper. You did a good job with varying the degrees of your ellipses to create a better illusion of depth though.

    Moving onto your constructions, I'll try to point out any mistakes I see to help you moving forward but you honestly did an amazing job here, congrats!

    • First thing that I'd like to point out is your use of shading. Even though you usually did a good job with using cast shadows to show how forms relate to each other (on the abdomen of your ant construction, for example) you occasionally strayed away from this and instead used form shading/hatching on your forms (like in the legs of your spider construction). Keep in mind that we're only allowed to use cast shadows since our main goal is to show how each form relates to each other, not to create a pretty picture. You can revisit this part of lesson 2 to get a better explanation.

    • This isn't as big of a deal but there were a couple of cases where you went slightly overboard with line weight. (on the thorax of your ant, the abdomen of your beetle and the thorax of your mosquito, for example) The main use of line weight is to show the relation between forms in very limited areas (like shown here). When you only use line weight to only show how forms overlap each other, it really helps make the image more readable. When you start using it more loosely though, line weight only really helps reinforce the silhouette. Try to think about how the line weight you're about the place helps show the relation between the forms and when placing the line weight, only draw through the parts where it's necessary (following the method presented here) instead of drawing through the entire line.

    • I'm seeing that you think the mosquito construction looks rather off. I haven't seen your ref so I can't give an exact answer but the abdomen of your construction looks like it's connected to the thorax through the middle of it, although on the pictures I've seen online, it looks like it's supposed to be connecting through to the top of the thorax instead. Also the abdomen looks like it's supposed to be made out of four planes instead of a normal sausage. But honestly, your construction looks pretty good!

    • In the beetle construction, it can be a bit confusing since the legs are supposed to emerge from the thorax but in some cases, thorax actually reaches into the abdomen! You can take a look at a part of this video (10.23-12.42) for a better explanation.

    I don't think I have anything else to add! If you have any questions however, I'd be happy to hear them! You did a great job overall so I'm going to mark this as complete, good luck ahead!

    Next Steps:

    move on to lesson 5

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    2 users agree
    1:31 PM, Monday May 17th 2021

    Hello again Ran, congrats on finishing lesson 3! I'll be looking over your work.

    Starting with your arrows, they look pretty confident and you generally did a good job with compressing the further end of them to create a more 3D image. This carries over to your leaves and branches as well. It seems that you were always mindful of how every form sits and flows through space, great job!

    Onto your leaves, again, you did a great job with making them flow through the scene and you also experimented with more complex shapes. Except for a couple of random scribbles (mainly in the bottom left leaf), you did a great job with textures as well. I'm very thankful that after pointing out a couple of mistakes on your lesson 2 critique, you started to work on your textures. Because of this, your textures look far more convincing here. You also did a good job with respecting the initial construction when adding detail to the edges.

    Branches look pretty good as well, you managed to keep up the illusion of depth by varying the degrees of your ellipses. Your lines seem to taper with each other relatively well. However, you seem to stray away from the method on the lesson page for most of your constructions. Instead of starting to draw your lines from the ellipses and letting them overlap with the previous line, you usually started your lines where the previous one ended or drew the connection between a couple of ellipses in a single stroke. Because of this, your lines rarely flow consistently. Remember that letting your lines overlap with each other helps you achieve a smoother transition between each segment.

    Moving onto your plant constructions, you managed to draw as big as possible, while still maintaining the solidity. You also seem to build them in stages, while still respecting the initial construction. Here are a few observations to help you moving forward:

    • First thing I want to draw your attention to is your use of line weight. The main use of line weight is to help clarify how forms overlap each other in very specific areas (like shown here). When used for this purpose, line weight really helps make the image more readable. However, when used more loosely, line weight really only helps reinforce the silhouette of the construction and this is true for some of your constructions. On this page for example, because you tried applying line weight consistently on most parts of your construction, it doesn't really add much to the actual drawing and instead, it creates a more clustered image. You can take a look at this diagram to see how to apply line weight correctly. Also you didn't really need to apply line weight to the flower pots since they aren't an important part of the construction.

    • On this construction, you seem to add the extra part outside the leaves rather loosely. This is very nitpicky but try to ghost through the curves until you're comfortable with how they sit next to the lines of the leaf.

    I honestly don't have much to add. Other than some occasional line weight mistakes, you did a great job with this lesson! If you have any questions, feel free to ask me here or on discord but I'm going to mark this as complete, good luck with lesson 4!

    Next Steps:

    move on to lesson 4

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    2 users agree
    2:31 PM, Tuesday May 11th 2021

    Hello Findlost, 250 Boxes is a big step, congrats on making it through! I'll be looking over your work.

    Throughout the lesson, I can see that the quality of your mark making has generally improved. Your lines were usually neither accurate or confident at the beginning but you managed to make your lines straighter and more accurate as you progressed through the challenge. You did a good job with drawing big boxes with different shapes as well. However, there are still some mistakes I want to point out so you can work on them moving forward. Firstly, I noticed that when your lines weren't fully accurate, you tried to correct them by drawing over the initial line. Always remember that trying to fix your mistakes with ink will only shift the viewer's attention to them. I also noticed a couple of wobbly lines in most pages as well. This implies that you weren't fully confident with your lines and perhaps a bit hesitant. Always remember that confidence is more important than accuracy. Ghost through each line and make sure to execute them confidently. If you want to read more about hesitation, make sure to take a look at this comment by Uncomfy.

    Like your normal lines, you were a bit hesitant with your line weight as well. Remember to treat line weight like a normal line, make sure to ghost through until you're comfortable with the mark you're planning to make and execute with confidence. You can take a look at this demo to see how to properly apply your line weight.

    Finally, even though your convergences got better as you kept going, I think you could still find this diagram helpful. You mostly had trouble with the inner corner of the box and that is completely fine since the inner corner is usually the hardest one to place correctly. You can take a look at this demo to see a different way of placing the inner corner.

    Overall, you did a pretty good job! Try to experiment with different orientations of boxes in the future, as shown here. I'm going to mark this lesson as complete so if you have any questions, feel free to ask them here or tag me on discord with the same name, good luck!

    Next Steps:

    Move on to Lesson 2!

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    4:02 PM, Wednesday May 5th 2021

    I'm so glad that you were happy with my constructions! I truly do feel like my constructions would be waay worse if I hadn't received the two other critiques you've given me before. Even though it kinda makes me sad that I still have some issues with line weight/confidence I will do my best to work on them as much as possible.

    Anyways, thank you again friend. Hope you have the same luck in your art journey as I had :)

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Like the Staedtlers, these also come in a set of multiple weights - the ones we use are F. One useful thing in these sets however (if you can't find the pens individually) is that some of the sets come with a brush pen (the B size). These can be helpful in filling out big black areas.

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