Uncomfortable

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  • Sharing the Knowledge
    1:51 PM, Tuesday August 16th 2022

    I would recommend reviewing this video from Lesson 0, to get a refresher on exactly how you ought to be tackling the homework.

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    7:19 PM, Monday August 15th 2022

    The advice Tofu provided is right - although more accurately, it's about making good use of the space available to you on the page, and allowing yourself to give each construction as much room as it individually requires. Only when that drawing is done should we assess whether there is enough room for another. If there is, we should certainly add it, and reassess once again. If there isn't, it's perfectly okay to have just one drawing on a given page as long as it is making full use of the space available to it.

    So! Jumping right in with your arrows, you're doing a great job of drawing these with a great deal of confidence, which really helps to sell the sense of force with which they move through the world. You're generally doing well to add line weight only at the areas with overlaps, although I do see some spots where you add line weight more liberally, across longer sections of line. Always stick to those overlaps, so you can reduce just how much line weight you have to add.

    Continuing onto your leaves, you've done a great job of carrying the confidence forward from the previous exercise, which has in turn helped you to achieve a sense of not only how these leaves sit statically in 3D space, but also how they move through the space they occupy. I'm pleased to see that you've tackled both various kinds of edge detail, as well as some more complex leaf structures. You handled the latter quite well, although with the former, I want to warn you against attempting to draw many different protrusions/features/additions in a single stroke. Each one should be drawn individually, such that it rises off and returns to the existing edge in as seamless a manner you can achieve. Don't try to redraw the entire thing or replace one step of construction with the next, and avoid zigzagging back and forth as explained here.

    Moving onto your branches, it appears that you may not have followed the instructions for this one too carefully. As explained here, the edges need to be drawn in a very specific manner. Each one starts from one ellipse, continues past the second and stops halfway to the third. The next then starts at the second ellipse, repeating the pattern. This allows for a healthy overlap between them, which in turn helps us achieve a smoother, more seamless transition from one to the next.

    Onto your plant constructions, there's a lot you're doing well here, although there are definitely some points I want to offer that'll help you continue to make the most out of these constructional drawing exercises going forward:

    • One really important aspect of construction as a process is that it requires us to maintain a tight, specific relationship from one constructional step to the next. This is what allows the solidity from the simpler stages to transfer forwards as we build up more complexity. There are definitely places that stand out where you're ending up with much more vague or loose relationships, where the linework is either a little too loose on its own, or where there are gaps left. We can see a fair bit of this here. Since you're using the ellipses (similarly to in the hibiscus demo) to establish how far out each petal should reach, you should be sure to have every flow line then end at the perimeter of its given ellipse. Then each leaf stops at the furthest extent of the flow line, and no farther. Keep those relationships much tighter than you have been.

    • When constructing cylindrical flower pots, be sure to do so around a central minor axis line to help in aligning the various ellipses.

    • Furthermore, be sure to included as many ellipses as are required to flesh out the entirety of the structure - at minimum that's going to include another ellipse inset within the opening to establish the thickness of the rim, rather than leaving it paper thin. Another to establish the level of the soil and provide the stem something to intersect with in order to make it feel more grounded would also generally be beneficial.

    • Also, remember that as explained in the Lesson 1 ellipses video, the farther we slide along a structure, the wider its cross-sectional slices will be. On this one you have the top ellipse as the wider one, and the base as the narrower. This should be reversed.

    • Last point about flower pots - if such a form gets cut off along the edge of a page, be sure not to leave it open ended. Cap it off - if it's cylindrical, do so with an ellipse, but generally it's about ensuring that it's a closed off 3D form. Leaving it open will cause the viewer to interpret it as a flat shape.

    Now, before I mark this lesson as complete, I am going to need you to do one more page of branches, as that exercise was not done correctly.

    Next Steps:

    Please submit 1 page of branches.

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    0 users agree
    6:58 PM, Monday August 15th 2022

    Starting with your arrows, you're doing a great job with your linework here, executing it with a great deal of confidence which really helps to sell the illusion of the force with which those arrows push through the world. I do want to warn you against using line weight too liberally though - focus its use specifically on clarifying the overlaps between forms, by limiting it to the localized areas where those overlaps occur as shown here.

    Now continuing onto your leaves, while that confidence does have a positive impact on conveying the fluidity of your leaf structures, there are definitely quite a few where it ends up getting much more stiff (especially with these towards the upper right). It is easy to get too focused on how the leaves themselves are 3D structures, to forget that they are flat and effectively subject to all the forces of wind and air currents. By continuing to focus on the flow line's role - to establish how the leaf moves through the world - by executing it with the same kind of confidence you demonstrated in your arrows, you'll be able to get a better sense of how it moves through the space it occupies, from moment to moment. Also, adding a little arrow head to its tip will help with creating that connection in your mind.

    I did notice that you appear not to have made any attempts to build upon your basic leaf structures with additional edge detail - I'll check how you're doing that in your later constructions, and we'll see if there are any points from this exercise you might be missing.

    Moving onto your branches, it appears that you may not have followed the instructions for this one too carefully. As explained here, the edges need to be drawn in a very specific manner. Each one starts from one ellipse, continues past the second and stops halfway to the third. The next then starts at the second ellipse, repeating the pattern. This allows for a healthy overlap between them, which in turn helps us achieve a smoother, more seamless transition from one to the next.

    Looking at your plant constructions, there's a lot you're doing well here, although there are a few points I want to call out:

    • Unfortunately it does seem that you missed some important points on the topic of building up edge detail onto your leaves (in cases like this). As noted here, you should not be zigzagging your edge detail back and forth with a single continuous stroke. Each individual 'bump' must be drawn as its own separate mark. The goal here is not to replace or redraw the existing structure, but rather to build on top of it. This requires each mark to rise off the existing silhouette's edge, and to return to it.

    • This isn't strictly a mistake as it's not something that's stressed throughout this lesson, but it is something I wanted to call out to you. On the tree branch for this one you applied a similar approach to add bumps and irregularities along the form's edge. Unfortunately the technique we use for leaves and flower petals is one that actively flattens structures out. We can use it on those structures because they're already flat - but if we use it to one that has volume, like a branch or a tube, it ends up undermining its solidity. You can read more about this, and see an alternate approach for adding those kinds of bumps, in these notes.

    • Keep the relationships between your phases of construction tight and specific, and avoid arbitrary gaps between them. So for example, on this daisy drawing, the petals should end right at the tip of their corresponding flow line. You've left quite a few gaps of variable sizes between the end of the flow lines and the tip of the petals.

    Now, I'm not going to require you to do any more full plant constructions, but I do want to address the issues with the leaves and branches so you will find revisions assigned below.

    Next Steps:

    Please submit:

    • 1 page of leaves. Be sure to add edge detail and explore the more complex leaf structures (like those addressed here).

    • 1 page of branches.

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    0 users agree
    6:24 PM, Monday August 15th 2022

    Jumping in with the arrows, you've done a great job of drawing these with a great deal of confidence - and I'm pleased to see that this carries over to your addition of line weight at the zigzagging areas as well, as some students do get very stiff and focus more on tracing back over the lines. Keeping things confident helps to push the sense of fluidity with which the structures are moving through all three dimensions of space. The only thing I'd change when adding line weight is that if you put the mark down and it doesn't end up where you want it, try not to get into the habit of trying again. You get a shot, sometimes it goes well, sometimes it doesn't, but you don't want to get in the habit of reflexively going back over it until one falls where you need it to.

    Anyway - focusing on that confidence, it carries over really nicely into your leaves, where you're capturing not only how they sit statically in 3D space, but also how they move through the space they occupy. In regards to how you're building up edge detail, it looks like you're adding large numbers of bumps together, at least in some cases, and it results in areas where you zigzag back and forth the existing edge, which as explained here needs to be avoided. Be sure to draw each individual bump with a separate stroke, so as to maintain a tight, specific relationships with the existing edge, so that each step of construction involves actually modifying the singular cohesive silhouette of the structure you're building upon - rather than trying to redraw or replace the existing structure.

    Lastly, I did notice that you appeared to be filling in areas with black in a somewhat more arbitrary fashion - it's unclear what exactly you're using to decide where the filled black goes, but you'll want to review these notes about what we're doing as we build up textural detail.

    Continuing onto your branches, your work here is coming along quite well! You're allowing for a healthy overlap between the segments (although I would advise you to try to use the last chunk of the previous segment as a runway, overlapping it more directly before continuing onto the next target as shown here).

    Moving onto your actual plant constructions, you have by and large applied the techniques from the lesson quite well. I have a few points I want to call out to help keep you continue to get the most out of the exercises in this course, however:

    • In this drawing, I feel that your construction starts to devolve a bit into more of a "collection of lines on a page" simply because of the number of stray marks that appear to be floating around. When doing the kinds of constructions we do in this course, try and always focus on everything you introduce being its own complete, self-enclosed silhouette - avoid marks that linger on their own. I can also definitely see the zigzagging I addressed earlier - I know it can be tedious to draw a ton of individual little spiky protrusions, but ultimately this course requires one thing of you - that every form you construct, every shape you draw, and every mark you execute is given as much time as you require to do it to the best of your current ability. Often this means investing more time than you may want to.

    • Keep the relationships between your phases of construction tight and specific, and avoid arbitrary gaps between them. So for example, on this daisy drawing, the petals should end right at the tip of their corresponding flow line. You've left quite a few gaps of variable sizes between the end of the flow lines and the tip of the petals.

    • A minor point, but remember that when we're getting into detail, our focus is on defining (by implying) the textural forms that are present on the surface of the object. It seems you might be more generally looking at decoration as your goal - which essentually comes to doing whatever you can to make the drawing more visually pleasing and interesting. this has led you, on this page at least, into form shading which as mentioned here should not play a role in our constructions. Be sure to go through the list of reminders from that page, which I'd linked earlier.

    Anyway, all in all, your work is coming along well. I'll go ahead and mark this lesson as complete.

    Next Steps:

    Move onto lesson 4.

    This critique marks this lesson as complete.
    4:48 PM, Monday August 15th 2022

    This is definitely looking considerably better. In the case of the rose, here's a rough demo of how I'd tackle it. Note that I'm starting with a cylinder, as this gives me a structure I can then allow my flow lines to follow.

    I'll go ahead and mark this lesson as complete.

    Next Steps:

    Move onto Lesson 4.

    This critique marks this lesson as complete.
    4:46 PM, Monday August 15th 2022

    For the most part, your cylinders in boxes are done well - aside from a couple little instances and issues that I will address momentarily. Despite those, you do largely hold to the core principles of the exercise nicely. This exercise is really all about helping develop students' understanding of how to construct boxes which feature two opposite faces which are proportionally square, regardless of how the form is oriented in space. We do this not by memorizing every possible configuration, but rather by continuing to develop your subconscious understanding of space through repetition, and through analysis (by way of the line extensions).

    Where the box challenge's line extensions helped to develop a stronger sense of how to achieve more consistent convergences in our lines, here we add three more lines for each ellipse: the minor axis, and the two contact point lines. In checking how far off these are from converging towards the box's own vanishing points, we can see how far off we were from having the ellipse represent a circle in 3D space, and in turn how far off we were from having the plane that encloses it from representing a square.

    Here are the main things to keep an eye on:

    • As before, there are a lot of cases here where you've forced vanishing points to infinity, resulting in too much parallelity in your side edges. Given that we're focusing with the line extensions on identifying how those lines behave as they converge, it does diminish that to a point. Fortunately this was not the case for all of your boxes, and you do have many that do have clearer convergences to them.

    • Be sure to extend your minor axis lines back as far as the others, so we can more fully understand how they behave, and compare them to the others of their same set. Right now you appear to be applying the correction approach used in the first section of the challenge, so there may be some confusion there.

    Anyway, I'll go ahead and mark this challenge as complete.

    Next Steps:

    Move onto Lesson 6.

    This critique marks this lesson as complete.
    7:49 PM, Saturday August 13th 2022

    For future reference, when giving other students feedback, you may want to try using Elodin's unofficial critique guides. He's got some for:

    The guides function something like checklists, giving you clear things to focus on and address to ensure that your feedback is thorough. Of course, either way the kind of feedback that is really helpful to students does take time - so if you don't have time to apply that kind of approach, then it may be best to leave it to others, simply because providing more limited feedback yourself will reduce the chances of the student getting feedback from others.

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    7:22 PM, Friday August 12th 2022

    Starting with the structural aspect of the challenge, you're doing fairly well. On a number of these, you've mindful of including several ellipses throughout the profile of the structure, allowing for an often subtle but well appreciated "bump" through the midsection that helps it to appear more inflated, as though it would land with a bounce rather than a solid thunk. That said, I do think this is something that could be exaggerated a bit further. I'd even go as far as recommending that you not push the foreshortening too hard (and avoid making that far end so much smaller), as it can actively counteract this subtle curve - and given the size of our wheels, it's pretty normal not to have too much foreshortening on objects of this scale.

    Now I can totally understand that given a more limited set of ellipse guides, as most students end up using here, you may simply not have the ellipses to achieve this. That's totally understandable, so temper any advice I offer on that front with your own knowledge of the tools you have at hand. That said, if you have to pick one side to sacrifice, I might go with maintaining a more similar degree on the far end (even though it technically should be wider), if it means having more flexibility when it comes to varying the scale through the midsection to exaggerate the bump.

    Moving on, one aspect of the structure that I do want to call out is the importance of establishing not only the outward face of the rims/spokes, but also the side planes of those structures. I do see you generally focusing more on the outward face, aside from a few exceptions like 7 where you filled in the side planes (which I wouldn't recommend, as it both falls under form shading which as explained here shouldn't play a role in our drawings for this course, and because it tends to create the impression of a separation between the front face (which still appears flat) and the black shape behind it (which the viewer will naturally want to interpret as a cast shadow first and foremost, resulting in more visual confusion). There's also 15 where you actually specifically drew the side planes but not the outward face.

    13 was one of the cases where this was handled well - you've got both the outward face and the side planes, and as a result it all feels more more solid and three dimensional. 23 is also really well done in this regard.

    Continuing onto the textural component of the challenge, this exercise is really meant to be something of a trap. Being as far removed from Lesson 2 as we are, it's entirely normal for students to forget the concepts discussed in Lesson 2 - and having that revealed here can spur them on to go and review that material with a certain amount of.. urgency, and perhaps a touch of embarrassment. It does appear that you've fallen into the trap as well.

    In tackling your tire treads, there are two main ways in which you've approached it. The vast majority of these involve pure outline-based construction, where you've built out the textural forms as you would any other textural form - using explicit markmaking, as discussed in Lesson 2. This ends up looking great when dealing with these wheels as they float in isolation, but when they become part of a larger construction or drawing, all of that compressed contrast/detail creates a focal point, drawing the viewer's eye whether you want it to or not.

    Working implicitly however - where we draw the shadows cast by those textural forms, and not the forms themselves - allows us far more flexibility, where we can choose to work with more or less contrast without physically changing the nature of the structure being represented, as shown here on this example of bush viper scales.

    It can be easy to confuse the use of cast shadows with the use of form shading however, and that brings us to the other approach you've used. In 22, we've got an example where you have attempted to use filled areas of solid black, but where you ended up using it to fill in the side faces of those textural forms. As discussed in regards to the spokes on number 7, this is more akin to form shading - we make the faces darker or lighter based on their orientation in space.

    Now, I do have an explanation as to the distinction between this and actually using the cast shadows that these textural forms cast upon their surrounding surfaces that I'd written up for another student that includes a diagram. I'm going to paste them below, but you may find that the explanation is a little hard to make heads or tails of at first. If it's not, that's great - but if it is, that's fine too. Give it a couple read throughs now, but sit on it for a while and come back to it later. You may find it makes a bit more sense once you've had a chance to let it sink in over time.

    Here's the diagram and here's the explanation:

    On the top, we've got the structural outlines for the given form - of course, since we want to work implicitly, we cannot use outlines. In the second row, we've got two options for conveying that textural form through the use of filled black shapes. On the left, they fill in the side planes, placing those shapes on the surface of the form itself, and actually filling in areas that are already enclosed and defined on the form and leaving its "top" face empty. This would be incorrect, more similar to form shading and not a cast shadow. On the right, we have an actual cast shadow - they look similar, but the key point to pay attention to is shown in the third row - it is the actual silhouette of the form itself which is implied. We've removed all of the internal edges of the form, and so while it looks kind of like the top face, but if you look more closely, it has certain subtle elements that are much more nuanced - instead of just using purely horizontal and vertical edges, we have some diagonals that come from the edges of the textural form that exist in the "depth" dimension of space (so if your horizontals were X and your verticals were Y, those diagonals come from that which exists in the Z dimension).

    And that covers it. Of course, since the 'trap' was entirely intentional, this is not something I hold students back over. I'll go ahead and mark this challenge as complete - but be sure to revisit the Lesson 2 texture section, especially these reminders, before continuing forwards.

    Next Steps:

    Move onto lesson 7.

    This critique marks this lesson as complete.
    0 users agree
    7:02 PM, Friday August 12th 2022

    Starting with your cylinders around arbitrary minor axes, there are indeed a few important points I want to remind you of, so going forward you can continue to get the most out of this exercise. Most of these pertain to basic principles of the course that you may have forgotten to apply, but there are some additional points relating to the exercise specifically that I will touch upon. First, the things you're forgetting:

    • You don't appear to be drawing through your ellipses two full times before lifting your pen. Sometimes you'll draw through more partially (stopping at maybe 1.5 turns of the ellipse, often less), which suggests to me that you're aware of the requirement, but that you're not thinking enough about that particular action as you take it.

    • You're not employing the ghosting method in the execution of your marks. Remember that it should be applied to every freehand structural mark we make throughout this course - straight lines especially, but ellipses as well. The ghosting method, as outlined here is a process that splits a complex problem into a series of separate steps, allowing us to commit our resources entirely to each step as required. First we plan out our stroke, identifying what its job is and how we can execute it so as to accomplish that task as effectively as possible. Then we ghost through the motion, getting familiar with the motion required of us. And finally we execute the stroke without hesitation. When students slip away from this process, they end up trying to do everything in the execution phase, which results in poorer planning, less muscle memory to support the action, and more hesitation resulting in a wobblier line. In your work, your straight edges are hesitant, though to varying degrees, ranging from pretty smooth to visibly shaky. Your ellipses also tend to come out less evenly than they should, due to the absence of a confident execution using the whole arm from the shoulder.

    Another point I wanted to draw to your attention is that there are a lot of cases here where rather than simply making the foreshortening very shallow (which we can see on plenty of other cases, like 121 and 107 for example where the convergence of the side edges is gradual and minimal, but still visible), you are instead actively eliminating that convergence/foreshortening - like in 137 (though there are plenty of other such cases throughout the work).

    This is incorrect - it involves forcing the vanishing point to 'infinity' in the manner discussed in Lesson 1. We do not have direct control over where the vanishing point goes. We decide how the form is to be oriented in space, and it is that which determines where the vanishing point will fall, and how the side edges will converge. The only circumstance in which a vanishing point goes to infinity is if the edges it governs in 3D space actually run perpendicularly to the viewer's angle of sight - basically running straight across their field of view, not slanting towards or away from them through the depth of the scene. Given that we're rotating our cylinders freely and randomly throughout this exercise, we can pretty much assume that we won't end up with such a circumstance here, and should at least include the kind of slight convergence you used in those other examples I listed.

    Now, I should mention that in the assignment section of the challenge, I did ask that you vary the rate of foreshortening for your cylinders, working with both shallow and dramatic foreshortening - you still tended to stick to the shallower end of the scale, so be sure to follow the instructions more closely in the future.

    As to the cylinders in boxes, your submission appears to be incomplete. I'm only seeing 4 pages, and the page from 13-18 is posted twice. I'm going to need you to submit the missing boxes before I can complete my critique.

    Next Steps:

    Please submit the missing 82 cylinders in boxes.

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    0 users agree
    6:50 PM, Friday August 12th 2022

    Starting with your arrows, you're off to a good one - you're executing them with a great deal of confidence, which really helps to sell the sense of fluidity with which they move through all three dimensions of space. This carries over very nicely into your leaves as well, where you're capturing not only how they individually sit in 3D space, but also how they actively move through the space they occupy from moment to moment.

    When it comes to adding edge detail to those structures, I'm pleased to see that you're working with individual marks (as opposed to outright redrawing the entirety of each leaf's edge in one go), although you are still quite susceptible to zigzagging your edge detail back and for the existing edge, which as explained here, should be avoided, as it results in a much weaker relationship between the phases of construction. In turn, this impedes how much of the solidity from the simpler steps can be carried forward as we build up more complexity.

    Continuing onto your branches, there are a few points I wanted to call to your attention:

    • The most important part is in regards to how you've approached laying out your edges. Most importantly, you don't appear to really be following the specific approach detailed in the instructions, where each segment starts at one ellipse, continues past the second, and stops halfway to the third, with the next one starting at the second ellipse and repeating the pattern. In most cases you do not appear to have not extended each segment fully halfway to the next ellipse, and I caught at least one where you started your next segment further along, which further minimizes the overlap. That overlap is important, as it allows us to achieve a smoother, more seamless transition from one to the next.

    • Remember that as per the Lesson 1 ellipses video, the degree of your ellipse should be shifting wider as we slide further along the length of the branches, rather than remaining the same.

    • Lastly, you appear not to be drawing through your ellipses two full times, as noted in Lesson 1.

    Continuing onto your plant constructions, overall your work here is pretty well done. I do have a couple things to draw to your attention, and a bit more to discuss when it comes to the detail phase of things, but aside from the points that I've already addressed, you're doing fairly well.

    So, here are the main points I wanted to call out:

    • For your petals on this page you tend to move ahead in complexity - specifically adding those wavy edges - without first laying down a simpler edge upon which we can build up that edge detail. In effect, you're skipping important constructional steps. We can see plenty of that throughout the petals here, but there are somewhat subtler examples of this like here.

    • For this daisy, I noticed that you did attempt to employ the approach shown in the hibiscus demo, where we use an ellipse to establish the bounds to which our petals will extend. You used it correctly in a lot of cases, but I do want to note that it's important you maintain tight, specific relationships between the steps of construction. So the ellipse(s) establish how far out your petals will extend - when we decide to employ that tool, it's because we want all of our petals to extend to a specific distance or to a specific landmark, defined by the ellipses. If we have several different groupings of petals, we can - as you've done here - lay out several ellipses. But what we don't want to end up with are any petals that don't extend to a defined perimeter, or any that casually overshoot or undershoot an existing perimeter by some small measure - as these things suggest a weak, looser relationship. Always keep those relationships tight and specific. Similarly, ensure that once those flow lines have extended to the correct perimeter (which you did here on this hibiscus), that the corresponding petals also end where their flow line does, instead of leaving an arbitrary gap between those two ends, which we do see happening in that hibiscus.

    • When constructing your cylindrical flower pots, like the bonsai tree, be sure to do so around a central minor axis line to help in aligning your various ellipses to one another. Also, don't forget that degree shift point I raised in regards to your branches - here you start out very wide at the opening, then go very narrow, then widen again. Instead you'd want to go narrow-wider-widest, with the widest point being the base. Lastly, be sure to add as many ellipses as you require to flesh out the entirety of the structure - at minimum, it's a good idea to include another ellipse inset within the opening to establish the thickness of the rim, as well as another at the level of the soil so the stem of the plant has something to intersect with.

    The last thing I wanted to discuss is more of a reminder as to what exactly we're doing in this course when it comes to the detail phase of things, and the textural concepts introduced in the last lesson. It's important to note that once our construction is all finished, we're not simply shifting gears to transferring purely visual information, from the reference to our drawing with the intent to 'decorate' it. Decoration being another word for doing whatever we can to make the drawing appear more visually interesting. Decoration's simply not a particularly clear goal to pursue, as there's no specific point at which one has added enough decoration.

    What we're doing in this course can be broken into two distinct sections - construction and texture - and they both focus on the same concept. With construction we're communicating to the viewer what they need to know to understand how they might manipulate this object with their hands, were it in front of them. With texture, we're communicating to the viewer what they need to know to understand what it'd feel like to run their fingers over the object's various surfaces. Both of these focus on communicating three dimensional information. Both sections have specific jobs to accomplish, and none of it has to do with making the drawing look nice.

    Instead of focusing on decoration, what we draw here comes down to what is actually physically present in our construction, just on a smaller scale. As discussed back in Lesson 2's texture section, we focus on each individual textural form, focusing on them one at a time and using the information present in the reference image to help identify and understand how every such textural form sits in 3D space, and how it relates within that space to its neighbours. Once we understand how the textural form sits in the world, we then design the appropriate shadow shape that it would cast on its surroundings. The shadow shape is important, because it's that specific shape which helps define the relationship between the form casting it, and the surface receiving it.

    As a result of this approach, you'll find yourself thinking less about excuses to add more ink, and instead you'll be working in the opposite - trying to get the information across while putting as little ink down as is strictly needed, and using those implicit markmaking techniques from Lesson 2 to help you with that.

    Now I've given you a number of things to keep in mind, but I'm going to leave them to you to address in your own practice, as overall I still feel you're applying the core principles of the lesson well. I'll go ahead and mark this lesson as complete.

    Next Steps:

    Move onto lesson 4.

    This critique marks this lesson as complete.
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Staedtler Pigment Liners

Staedtler Pigment Liners

These are what I use when doing these exercises. They usually run somewhere in the middle of the price/quality range, and are often sold in sets of different line weights - remember that for the Drawabox lessons, we only really use the 0.5s, so try and find sets that sell only one size.

Alternatively, if at all possible, going to an art supply store and buying the pens in person is often better because they'll generally sell them individually and allow you to test them out before you buy (to weed out any duds).

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