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Rivgar

Victorious

Joined 2 years ago

14600 Reputation

rivgar's Sketchbook

  • Victorious
  • High Roller
  • Technician
  • Geometric Guerilla
  • Tamer of Beasts
  • The Fearless
  • Giver of Life
  • Dimensional Dominator
  • The Relentless
  • Basics Brawler
  • Sharing the Knowledge
    2 users agree
    2:42 PM, Monday January 3rd 2022

    Helle Thatonemushroomguy,

    I hope you are well,

    Starting with your sausages.

    Those are done really well, it shows that you have a great understanding of 3d forms and how they react to each other in space when you add shadows you do think about the curvature of the form it is cast on. But sometimes you add those lines to your sausages, this is not a bad thing to do, but there are places where it definitely confused viewers than anything. Additionally, those are not simple sausages, as it seems to me you add those stripes to them.

    Moving onto your animals

    Those look really great, but our focus isn't to make good-looking drawings. It is to learn a "thing" through exercises.

    That said you can use methods learned in lesson to make a solid and believable drawing that focuses more on form than looks. There are a few minor things that I want to point out:

    • Make your cranium smaller. I went over a couple of your heads and drew brow ridges as you sometimes miss this step and by missing it you get a flat and confusing result. Keep in mind that with construction we want to draw by piling forms on top of each other. Step by step, patiently without winging any 2d forms.

    • Remember to not cut back into your shapes. We work additively, meaning we only add more 3d mass on previous mass, we don't subtract.

    • There are times where your linework isn't as consistent as in other parts of your work. Give each line as much given patient as it needs to be confidently made with ghosting.

    Conclusion

    There were only a few minor mistakes done by you. You clearly grasped how to make believable drawings with 3d forms and masses. Your linework is mostly great, but there are rarely lines that could be a lot better if given more time. I will mark this lesson as complete.

    I do know that Soprano already did a critique for you, but I feel it is missing guidance for you and he didn't point out any of your mistakes.

    If you have any questions feel free to ask me here,

    Have fun during your journey,

    Next Steps:

    Continue to 250 cylinder challenge

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    1:06 PM, Friday December 24th 2021

    You did quite a good job with those leaves, you could push the flow line a bit further but that's good enough for now, also there could be a lot more of them on the page.

    For your plants, those are definitely better. You are clearly more confident with lines but there are places where you run out of patience. The pitcher plant has quite a few sloppy lines, as shown here.

    Be more patient with lines, I know it is hard sometimes. But when you feel like you have run out of it, take a break, even if it is for 2 minutes.

    I will mark this lesson as complete then.

    Next Steps:

    Continue to lesson 4

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete. In order for the student to receive their completion badge, this critique will need 2 agreements from other members of the community.
    2 users agree
    6:59 PM, Saturday December 18th 2021

    Hello Koyomi,

    I hope you are well,

    Starting with your arrows

    They are done quite well. You executed them really confidently with your linework, but I notice that you struggle a bit with putting them in a perspective. You attempt to do it, but you don't push the foreshortening(bigger if near the viewer, smaller is away from the viewer) that much when needed.

    Your lines wobble and aren't as confident as I would want them to be. Remember to ghost each line with your shoulder with your wrist locked. Take as much time as you need and be patient.

    Moving to leaves

    Those are done really good. Your use of flow line is quite great there. That said few of them have a problem of bending in unnatural fashion. There are few leaves in which zigzags didn't get as much love as in other leaves, but your didn't fall into common trap of autopiloting them.

    Keep in mind that when we add zigzagging to the edges. We give one stroke, one trajectory, don't autopilot those. Be mindful of each stroke.

    Next, branches

    There are leftovers from your previous segments . Be sure to draw using the shoulder with a ghosting method. We want to execute our strokes confidently and make them go over the next ellipses. By following this process correctly we create a seamless illusion of a smooth line that curves.

    Remember to draw through your ellipses 2-3 times when you do DAB exercises. Doing so we gain experience faster. This also allows us to create a smoother shape of our ellipse. This does happen later in the lesson, so please be mindful about this in the future, as it is extremely important to draw through your ellipses.

    Lastly plants

    You stick to construction heavily here and that's a really great sign. That said, there are few things I want to point out. There are also, as written previously, problem with you not drawing through your ellipses.

    You are drawing pretty small. Drawing small makes things harder for us. We draw more clumsily and it limits our ability to think through spatial problems. It also makes it awkward for our arm, especially when we don't have as much experience with a shoulder. You have plenty of blank space that should be used for your drawings.

    There are places where your lines become quite sloppy. That's because you don't commit to them enough. Remember to be patient with ghosting and take as much time as needed for each line. Then when it feels right, confidently execute the line. Also keep in mind to use your shoulder with a locked wrist.

    Conclusion

    Remember to draw bigger and be more patient with your lines. This would greatly benefit your work. There weren't any major mistakes done by you, just a few minor one. So I will mark this lesson as complete.

    If you have any question feel free to ask me here,

    Have fun on your journey,

    Next Steps:

    Continue to lesson 4

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    2 users agree
    9:22 PM, Friday December 17th 2021

    Hello Noodlecake,

    I hope you are well,

    Starting with your sausages

    As you realize yourself, your contours are quite off. Most important thing is that your contours aren't hooking around the courners, your contours on sausages and other forms would benefit greatly if you did that. You understand how the degree of ellipse works so it is a matter of practice to get it right.

    It doesnt matter if our contours are uneven, what we want to inform our viewer with them, is that our form is turning in space or how it exist in it.

    Moving to insects

    They are really solid, you made a great job executing those curved lines confidently. That said there are places where your line work could be better. That might be caused because you don't commit enough to those as they wobble. Remember to be patient with ghosting and take as much time as needed for each line. Then when it feels right, confidently execute the line. Also keep in mind to use your shoulder with a locked wrist.

    Next thing I want to point out is your line weight. Remember we use it to clarify overlaps of our form. What we want to do is add another line on top of our initial one and what we should get is an effect of our line becoming darker(as we give more ink to the line) and slightly wider(as ink spills slightly to the sides). Making our line wider isn't our goal, it is to make it stronger/darker. This diagram conveys what I am trying to say. We don't want to make our whole drawing outlined with line weight. We want to make sure our initial lines are as good as our abilities allow us to.

    Additionally the same as with line work, there are places where you are sloppy with the execution.

    Drawing small. You said it yourself but I want to make sure you understand we don't want to draw small. Drawing small makes things harder for us. We draw more clumsily and it limits our ability to think through spatial problems. It also makes it awkward for our arm, especially when we don't have as much experience with a shoulder. There is plenty of empty space on your pages so use it to full advantage. After finishing the 1st drawing, look at your page and think if there is enough space for the next one. But don't force things into a tiny corner.

    In your last drawing, you cut back into the head. This image teaches perfectly why we shouldn't do that as it flattens the form out.

    Lastly when you add forms don't do it with 2d shapes. When we use construction we want every form/mass to be 3d. I went over one of your drawing, which contains good use of it and bad one.

    Conclusion

    You did a good job absorbing material covered in this lesson. There are few areas that you slightly lack knowledge but those areas are used in lesson 5. So I will mark this lesson as complete.. Remember to practice those contours as this is one of your biggest weaknesses in this lesson.

    If you have any questions feel free to ask me,

    Have fun on your journey,

    Next Steps:

    Move to lesson 5

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    2 users agree
    1:04 PM, Thursday December 16th 2021

    Hello Cytori,

    I hope you are well,

    I don't think the color of your fineliner matters, but it is good practice to not be wasteful with your money and use up the remaining fineliners.

    Starting with sausages

    Those are quite great, as you change the degrees of the contours properly. There are few cases where you make your contour sloppy, but your overall intention is to make them fit inside. Additionally on the topic that includes your contours, the linework. There are places where it could be better, try to be more patient with it.

    Moving to insects

    Looking through them I notice that your line weight is applied "incorrectly". It is a little messy and I know you could do better as your linework is quite good as you can make straight lines if you commit to them. So for lineweight remember to also ghost for that process. What we want to do is add another line on top of our initial one and what we should get is an effect of our line becoming darker(as we give more ink to the line) and slightly wider(as ink spills slightly to the sides). Making our line wider isn't our goal, it is to make it stronger/darker. This diagram conveys what I am trying to say. Keep in mind that we don't apply the lineweight with our wrist, what we want to use is our shoulder. Line weight is about clarifying the overlap between forms in specific areas.

    In your last beetle you made the segments of it "armor" too much 2d. This demo shows how we should tackle that part of an insect body. This might be caused as you used a top view, which I believe doesn't help us when we draw a 3d object. Additionally in front limbs, you have skipped quite a few steps building those "forearms". When we construct anything we want to add forms on top of forms. I went over this section of the drawing here, my execution is quite crude as I drew it with the mouse. But what I want you to gain from it, is that we draw those complex forms with stacking small simple ones to create a feel of a solid 3d drawing. You can see an example of this with this beetle horn demo, and even on this ant head demo.

    Lastly in this demo, I think you didn't draw proper sausages for the back legs. You again draw a silhouette, which creates a 2d shape. This is how it should have been made.

    In your dragonfly drawing I think it's wings are missaligned or that could be how the reference just is.

    Conclusion

    You did a good job absorbing the material covered in this lesson. In the future try to avoid the top view in your drawabox drawings. Now I will mark this lesson as complete.

    If you have any questions feel free to ask me here,

    Have fun on your journey,

    Next Steps:

    Continue to lesson 5

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    2 users agree
    7:41 PM, Tuesday December 14th 2021

    Hello Solonegociosserios,

    I hope you are well,

    You did a great job throughout the challenge. Good job extending your colored lines away from the viewer. Your lines are really straight, but you sometimes overshoot them. That's fine as we work in levels, but it is something to look out for in the future.

    Sometimes your lines converge in pairs, https://imgur.com/KSHwTwo this is what you do sometimes, we don't want that because we want all our 4 lines to meet in the same point, a vanishing point, as shown here https://imgur.com/8PqQLE0. That says to me that you perhaps lost your initial vanishing point. This diagram should also help you understand the angles of lines converging to the vanishing point. The inner lines have a smaller degree unless our box is long and it also depends on the position of our vanishing point. I want you to remember that our lines should always converge in one point, vanishing point, but they never meet in pairs.

    Also when you add hatching remember to keep it even and ghost it as it is line too. Don't make it messy, as when we add hatching to the face, it will become our point of interest for that box, so we want to make that point pleasant to the eye.

    Your lineweight is a little messy and I know you could do better as your linework is quite good as you can make straight lines if you commit to them. So for lineweight remember to also ghost for that process. What we want to do is add another line on top of our initial one and what we should get is an effect of our line becoming darker(as we give more ink to the line) and slightly wider(as ink spills slightly to the sides). Making our line wider isn't our goal, it is to make it stronger/darker. This diagram conveys what I am trying to say.

    Don't repeat your lines, even if you made a bad line, leave it and treat it as if it was the correct one. We don't want to correct our lines as it starts bad habits and teaches us that we don't have to commit to our lines. Leave your bad line there to be seen. Next time you try to make a line, don't repeat the same mistake you did the previous time. This also includes lines made for lineweight.

    I will now mark this lesson as complete as you hadn't made any major mistakes in the challenge. Keep in mind what I wrote here for your future warmup.

    If you have any question feel free to ask me here,

    Have fun during your journey,

    Next Steps:

    Continue to lesson 2

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    1 users agree
    4:55 PM, Thursday December 9th 2021

    Hello Lupursian,

    I hope you are well,

    Starting with arrows

    Those are made quite well. You are not afraid to overlap them. You also make them smaller as they go into the distance, which creates a feel of perspective. I like that some of them have that beveled feeling, but I think that is caused by not spending enough time ghosting, so keep in mind to give that step more time.

    Moving to leaves

    You made them fairly good, but they feel really stiff, that might be caused by not giving the flow line enough time. Remember to give the flow line a really good thought, as it is the most important thing when it comes to the leaves we are drawing in this exercise. Few of your leaves have a problem of zigzagging edges. Keep in mind that we give one stroke one trajectory, don't autopilot those. Be mindful of each stroke.

    Next, branches

    They are looking pretty good. But sometimes there are leftovers from your previous segments. Be sure to draw using the shoulder with a ghosting method. We want to execute our strokes confidently and make them go over the next ellipses. By following this process correctly we create a seamless illusion of a smooth line that curves. Additionally your line work could see some work. Good work on drawing through your ellipses 2-3 times here and in the rest of the lesson.

    Lastly plants

    In the beginning you are drawing 5, then 3 and lastly 1 per page. Make sure in the future you are still drawing only 1 plant per page. That's because drawing small makes things harder for us. We draw more clumsily and it limits our ability to think through spatial problems. It also makes it awkward for our arm, especially when we don't have as much experience with a shoulder. There is plenty of empty space on your pages so use it to full advantage. After finishing the 1st drawing, look at your page and think if there is enough space for the next one. But don't force things into a tiny corner.

    Don't repeat your lines, even if you made a bad line, leave it and treat it as if it was the correct one. We don't want to correct our lines as it starts bad habits and teaches us that we don't have to commit to our lines. Leave your bad line there to be seen. Next time you try to make a line, don't repeat the same mistake you did the previous time.

    You don't commit enough to lines as they wobble. Remember to be patient with ghosting and take as much time as needed for each line. Then when it feels right, confidently execute the line. Also keep in mind to use your shoulder with a locked wrist. That's your biggest weakness by far. Be more patient with every step of the line making process.

    Lastly make sure when you draw ellipses you think about their the individual degrees convey the orientation of that circular cross-section in space. You could think of it in a way, that if our ellipses are farther from the viewer, its degree is going to be bigger/wider. Great way to see that in real life is looking at the pots in your house or anything cylindrical. See what happens when we stand/sit/look at it from the bottom and then doing it again from farther distance, observe the degree of our ellipses.

    Conclusion

    You didn make any major mistakes, just a few minor ones. But what you need to work on is your linework, as it highly degrades your work. This skill takes a while to build, but for now you need to be patient and ghost as much as you can.

    Please submit an additional 1 page of leaves and 3 pages of plants, before I mark this as a complete.

    If you have any question feel free to ask me here,

    Next Steps:

    Please submit an additional 1 page of leaves and 3 pages of plants

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    3:58 PM, Thursday December 9th 2021

    Replying to mark this as a complete, sorry once again for my mistake.

    Take care,

    Next Steps:

    Continue to 250 cylinder challenge

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete. In order for the student to receive their completion badge, this critique will need 2 agreements from other members of the community.
    6:53 PM, Tuesday December 7th 2021

    Hello again,

    For your head construction,

    I notice that you skipped a couple of steps in the process, for example muzzle in a fox drawing and masses. You aren't supposed to use an initial ball for a head/cranium as our whole head, there should be additional masse. You should draw the cranium smaller. We sometimes underestimate how much fat and fur there is. By making it smaller it lets us focus more on those additional masses as the brow ridge, the cheekbones, muzzle, eye sockets, etc. Remember to fit masses written above like a puzzle, it helps to create an illusion of a solid 3d head.

    Take more time to look at your references. You should be looking more than drawing, be patient. You can't rush those things, but if you do your proportions and overall drawing is going to be worse in all aspects. I would recommend that you take more time for each drawing and studies.

    Here I went over your fox drawing and made a few minor adjustments and pointed out things that you should look at in the future like a silhouette of your reference and how you should build a head.

    I will now assign an extra 4 drawings. I also suggest for you to do the informal head demo until it stuck to you that you know how to use the method presented in it, for me it took a quite some time to get used to it and grasp it all. Tapir and moose head demos go more into that refined look of our masses so they should also greatly help you. Rat demo shows greatly how we should lay our initial three masses/balls small and build on top of them our additional forms.

    Next Steps:

    Please submit extra 4 animal drawings.

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    1 users agree
    6:36 PM, Monday December 6th 2021

    Hello Tryingtodrawabox, I hope you are well.

    Including demos isn't necessary, but it does help me judge how much work you have put into the lesson.

    Judging by the number of demos you have done you put a lot of work into it and it clearly pays off as you become quite fluent with animals.

    That said, let's start the critique.

    Starting with your organic intersections

    You did a great job handling them in a 3d space. You make your shadows follow the curvature of the form it is cast on. Your sasusages feel solid and thoroughly designed, but there are few that show you struggled with them(middle left of a 2nd page).

    In future avoid "mother ship" arrangements of your sausages, instead of making one big sausage and then adding smaller ones, try to keep them the same size. This will allow for more useful exploration of their interactions in space.

    Our sausages aren't stiff, they are supposed to be squishy. But here you made a stiff sausage, when it sag.

    Moving to animals

    You have quite a great job with those. At the beginning you were a bit stiff but after completing a couple of them you get so much better at them.

    That said, one thing that sometimes comes out badly is your linework. There are few cases(animals) which have a comparable worse linework and I believe it is caused by you rushing. Be patient with ghosting and take as much time as needed for each line. Then when it feels right, confidently execute the line.

    Sometimes you make a bad line and try to fix it in the form of repeating the line. Don't do that in the future, even if you made a bad line, leave it and treat it as if it was the correct one. We don't want to correct our lines as it starts bad habits and teaches us that we don't have to commit to our lines. Leave your bad line there to be seen. Next time you try to make a line, don't repeat the same mistake you did the previous time.

    I notice you wrote you have problems with heads, one way to fix that problem is to do them more. But there are a couple of things I will say that might help you with them.

    • Draw your cranium(initial ball for the head) smaller. We sometimes underestimate how much fat and fur there is.

    • Making it smaller also lets us focus more on those additional masses as the brow ridge, the cheekbones, muzzle, eye sockets, etc.

    • Try to fit masses written above like a puzzle. You already do it pretty well, but there are few heads where you forgot about it. Making them fit really help solidifies your drawing

    • This demo is the most up to date when it comes to how we should tackle heads. I know you already did it but it could be worth revisiting.

    In your octopus I noticed you have a bit of a problem with defining the degree of our contour line. Our contour's degree is defined by how far it is from the viewer, I am sure you will get more comfortable after the 250 cylinder challenge and lesson 6.

    In your pig I noticed you made a bunch of medium sized masses on the back. I would advise to merge a few of them into bigger one, as with more masses on the page the more busy the drawing becomes. It is also more pleasing to the eye to have varied masses but that is not the point of those exercises. But that's just my personal taste so don't take it too far.

    Conclusion

    You haven't made any major mistakes, just a few minor ones. There is also a big sign of growth from you, so I will mark this lesson as complete now.

    PS. Doing studies like you do, drawing just a leg or a head is a great way to get better at certain subjects so keep that way of learning in the future. If we can draw a head easier and better from those studies, our whole animal will also become better looking.

    Also it looks like I picked the wrong option, please reply to this so I can mark this as complete, sorry for inconvenience.

    If you have any questions feel free to ask me,

    Have fun during your journey.

    Next Steps:

    Continue to 250 cylinder challenge

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
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Sakura Pigma Microns

Sakura Pigma Microns

A lot of my students use these. The last time I used them was when I was in high school, and at the time I felt that they dried out pretty quickly, though I may have simply been mishandling them. As with all pens, make sure you're capping them when they're not in use, and try not to apply too much pressure. You really only need to be touching the page, not mashing your pen into it.

In terms of line weight, the sizes are pretty weird. 08 corresponds to 0.5mm, which is what I recommend for the drawabox lessons, whereas 05 corresponds to 0.45mm, which is pretty close and can also be used.

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