Nephele_cloud

The Fearless

The Indomitable (Autumn 2023)

Joined 12 months ago

5750 Reputation

nephele_cloud's Sketchbook

  • The Indomitable (Autumn 2023)
  • Sharing the Knowledge
  • The Fearless
  • Giver of Life
  • Dimensional Dominator
  • The Relentless
  • Basics Brawler
    4:35 AM, Friday March 1st 2024

    While doing construction i was struggling breaking them into simplest form but now you have explained how to approach them i pretty much got it.. I’ll keep in mind for the next time. Thanks for the critique it was so helpful ;) I'm so excited for lesson 5 :)))

    12:47 PM, Sunday February 11th 2024

    Glad to help :)

    3:51 AM, Wednesday February 7th 2024

    You're very welcome:)

    3:49 AM, Wednesday February 7th 2024

    welcome and good luck :)

    2 users agree
    9:34 AM, Monday February 5th 2024

    Hi DERPICKLE, Congratulations on Finishing Lesson 3 here's the critique;

    Arrows

    Starting with your arrows you're drawing your marks with a great deal of confidence which helps solidify the feeling of fluidity that arrows posses as they move through all the three dimensions of the world they exist in. You're keeping foreshorting in mind while constructing your arrows which allows you to make good use of the depth of your page, this gives a nice extra layer of tridimensionality to your arrows.

    Your usage of hatching helps you establish how your arrows twist and turn in space and further your own understanding of the tridimensional space these objects occupy. Don't forget to always make use of added line weight on top of the overlaps in order to reinforce their depth.

    Generally you're doing a good job with this exercise, I'd like to encourage you to get out of your comfort zone more often the next time you tackle this exercise in order to keep pushing yourself. Try arrows with different kinds of twists and turns and different rates of foreshortening, keep in mind that arrows are very flexible objects and can move freely across the world in all sorts of manners, so you should push yourself and explore the different possibilities.

    Branches

    Moving on to your branches they are coming along really decently as you're following the instructions for the exercise really well, which allows you to create some really solid but still organic looking structures.

    There are some visible tails present in your branch structures, but this is a very common mistake and your accuracy will naturally improve the more you practice this exercise. You may find that by limiting the amount of ellipses in your branches and spacing them further apart you'll allow for a bigger length of runway between ellipses and find it easier to ensure a smoother, more seamless transition between marks.

    For ellipses it's good to see that you are making the effort to draw through them twice, but you're still undershooting some and only drawing through them once, so don't forget to only lift your pen once you have drawn your marks twice. It's good to see that you're aware of the ellipse degree shift and making use of it in your constructions, which helps these structures feel more solid and believably tridimensional.

    Leaves

    The linework for your leaves is looking smooth which helps communicate their fluidity and sense of energy, it's good that you're not only trying to capture how these structures sit statically within space, but also how they move across it from moment to moment.

    Your addition of edge detail is generally looking good, as you don't usually attempt to capture more than one piece of edge detail at a time, and you generally construct your edge detail additively. You're also keeping the line thickness between your phases of construction roughly consistent, all of which is very good and helps you create a tighter, more solid construction that still feels fluid and energetic.

    Since you're already doing really well at constructing simple leaf structures it would have been nice to see you attempt more complex leaf structures as well.

    Plant Construction Section

    And lastly your plant constructions, which are coming along really well made. You're following the construction methods and techniques introduced in the lesson which allows you to construct really solid looking and believably tridimensional structures, you're demonstrating a strong, developing sense of spatial reasoning in these pages.

    There is not much to say about your work as it's looking really good.

    Overall your work is looking really well made, you're following the instructions for the exercises and your work is coming along quite tridimensional as a result, I have no doubt that you've understood the purpose of this lesson and as such I'm going to be marking this submission as complete. Good luck in Lesson 4.

    Next Steps:

    Lesson 4

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    2 users agree
    7:18 AM, Monday February 5th 2024

    Hi MAYJUR, I'll be handling your Lesson 2 critique.

    Congratulations on completing Lesson 2, it's definitely a lot more work than most people expect. Not only does it help deepen your understanding of important concepts but it shows your desire to learn as well. Be proud of what you've accomplished and that desire you've shown. That being said I'll try to keep this critique fairly brief so you can get working on the next steps as soon as possible.

    • Starting off in the arrows section your lines are looking smoothly and confidently drawn. You're doing a good job maintaining a consistent width as your arrows widen while moving closer to the viewer and with more mileage you'll become more consistent. I think you forgot to apply line weight  here are some things to look out for when applying it. I'd like you to experiment more with foreshortening in your future attempts, by utilizing it in both the arrows themselves as well as the negative space between their curves we can create a stronger illusion of an object moving through 3D space as demonstrated here.

    • Moving into the organic forms with contours exercise You're keeping your line work confident here which is great, if you feel uncomfortable working with contours still don't stress with more mileage it'll become more natural. Speaking of contours you're doing a good job trying to shift the degree of your contours so far, be sure to keep experimenting. The degree of a contour line basically represents the orientation of that cross-section in space, relative to the viewer, and as we slide along the sausage form, the cross section is either going to open up (allowing us to see more of it) or turn away from the viewer (allowing us to see less), as shown here. In Contour ellipses page the degrees of the ellipses don't change, they stay static; https://d15v304a6xpq4b.cloudfront.net/lesson_images/6822fd02.jpg This shouldn't happen even if the sausage is straight, here's an example of it with a top and a front view: as shown here and some of the Ellipses not touching the boundaries, or getting out of them: https://d15v304a6xpq4b.cloudfront.net/lesson_images/60054aa2.jpg This one can be caused by rushing or not ghosting enough.

    • In the texture exercises (more so in your dissections) you're focusing largely on outlines and negative space rather than cast shadows created by forms along the texture itself. This makes it difficult to create gradients with implied information which we could then use to create focal points in more complex pieces, by doing so we can prevent our viewers from being visually overwhelmed with too much detail. For more on the importance of focusing on cast shadows read here. I'd also like to quickly direct you to this image which shows that when we're working with thin line like textures if we outline and fill the shadow we will create a much more dynamic texture than simply drawing lines.

    • It's quite common for people to feel like they don't fully grasp the form intersections exercise, if you feel like you may fall into this category try not to stress too much. This exercise is just meant to get students to start thinking about how their forms relate to one another in 3D space, and how to define those relationships on the page. We'll be going over them more in the upcoming lessons. Your forms are looking quite solid here and they believably appear to belong in the same cohesive 3D space, good work.

    • While wrapping up your submission with the organic intersections exercise you do a great job demonstrating that your sense of 3D space is developing as your forms begin to wrap around each other believably. You're keeping your forms simple and easy to work with which is a good strategy to help produce good results. When it comes to your shadows you're pushing them enough so that they cast rather than just hugging the form that creates them which is a great start. Your shadows appear to be following a consistent light source, be sure to experiment with different angles and intensities when trying this exercise again in the future. I recommend pushing your light source to the top left or right corner of the page to start with, it's easier than working with a light directly above your form pile.

    Overall this was a solid submission, while you may have some things to work on I have no doubt you will improve with more mileage. I'll be marking your submission as complete and move you on to the next lesson.

    Keep practicing previous exercises as warm ups and good luck in lesson 3!

    Next Steps:

    Lesson 3

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    2 users agree
    3:14 PM, Sunday February 4th 2024

    Hi FABLE, I'll be handling your Lesson 2 critique.

    You're making progress towards understanding the concepts introduced in this lesson and hopefully this critique will help you in your future attempts.

    • Starting off in the arrows section your lines are looking smoothly and confidently drawn. You're doing a good job maintaining a consistent width as your arrows widen while moving closer to the viewer and with more mileage you'll become more consistent. It's good to see that you're trying to implement line weight, just remember that you want to keep your applications subtle and you'll become consistent with mileage. here are some things to look out for when applying it. I'd like you to experiment more with foreshortening in your future attempts, by utilizing it in both the arrows themselves as well as the negative space between their curves we can create a stronger illusion of an object moving through 3D space as demonstrated here.

    • Moving into the organic forms with contours exercise a couple of your forms are getting a bit too complex. We want to create our forms with both ends being the same size and to avoid any pinching, bloating, or stretching along the form's length as discussed here. You're keeping your line work confident here which is great, if you feel uncomfortable working with contours still don't stress with more mileage it'll become more natural. Speaking of contours you're doing a good job trying to shift the degree of your contours so far, be sure to keep experimenting. The degree of a contour line basically represents the orientation of that cross-section in space, relative to the viewer, and as we slide along the sausage form, the cross section is either going to open up (allowing us to see more of it) or turn away from the viewer (allowing us to see less), as shown here. In Contour ellipses page the degrees of the ellipses don't change, they stay static; https://d15v304a6xpq4b.cloudfront.net/lesson_images/6822fd02.jpg This shouldn't happen even if the sausage is straight, here's an example of it with a top and a front view: https://imgur.com/rXLBxSg and some of the Ellipses not touching the boundaries, or getting out of them: https://d15v304a6xpq4b.cloudfront.net/lesson_images/60054aa2.jpg This one can be caused by rushing or not ghosting enough.

    • In the texture exercises (more so in your dissections) you're focusing largely on outlines and negative space rather than cast shadows created by forms along the texture itself. This makes it difficult to create gradients with implied information which we could then use to create focal points in more complex pieces, by doing so we can prevent our viewers from being visually overwhelmed with too much detail. For more on the importance of focusing on cast shadows read here. I'd also like to quickly direct you to this image which shows that when we're working with thin line like textures if we outline and fill the shadow we will create a much more dynamic texture than simply drawing lines.

    • It's quite common for people to feel like they don't fully grasp the form intersections exercise, if you feel like you may fall into this category try not to stress too much. This exercise is just meant to get students to start thinking about how their forms relate to one another in 3D space, and how to define those relationships on the page. We'll be going over them more in the upcoming lessons.Your forms are looking quite solid here and they believably appear to belong in the same cohesive 3D space, good work.

    • While wrapping up your submission with the organic intersections exercise you do a great job demonstrating that your sense of 3D space is developing as your forms begin to wrap around each other believably. You're keeping your forms simple and easy to work with which is a good strategy to help produce good results. When it comes to your shadows you're pushing them enough so that they cast rather than just hugging the form that creates them which is a great start. Your shadows appear to be following a consistent light source, be sure to experiment with different angles and intensities when trying this exercise again in the future. I recommend pushing your light source to the top left or right corner of the page to start with, it's easier than working with a light directly above your form pile.

    Overall this was a solid submission, while you may have some things to work on I have no doubt you will improve with more mileage. I'll be marking your submission as complete and move you on to the next lesson.

    Keep practicing previous exercises as warm ups and good luck in lesson 3!

    Next Steps:

    Lesson 3

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    1 users agree
    2:24 PM, Sunday February 4th 2024

    Hi, I'll be handling your box challenge critique.

    Congratulations on completing the box challenge, it's definitely a lot more work than most people expect. Not only does it help deepen your understanding of important concepts but it shows your desire to learn as well. Be proud of what you've accomplished and that desire you've shown. That being said I'll try to keep this critique fairly brief so you can get working on the next steps as soon as possible.

    Things you did well:

    • Your construction lines are looking smooth and confidently drawn.

    • You're doing a great job of experimenting with proportions and rates of foreshortening. Experimenting is an important habit to build when learning any new skill, it helps form a more well rounded understanding. I hope you'll continue to display and nurture this habit in the future.

    Things you can work on:

    • When hatching you want to have both ends of the lines touching an edge of the form they're being drawn on rather than being left floating. Usually when left floating like this it's caused by people hesitating while worrying about accuracy. Remember to take your time to space each line with the ghosting method, and then draw them confidently just like any other line, accuracy will improve with more mileage.

    • Line weight isn't a requirement of the challenge but I do recommend practicing it in your future attempts. It's an incredibly useful tool but one that people often require a fair bit of mileage before they feel comfortable applying it. The sooner you start to build up that mileage the sooner you'll see better results.

    • There are times when your lines converge in pairs or you attempt to keep your lines a bit too parallel which results in them diverging. This is an example of lines converging in pairs, and this shows the relation between each line in a set and their respective vanishing point. The inner pair of lines will be quite similar unless the box gets quite long and the outer pair can vary a lot depending on the location of the vanishing point. Move it further away and the lines become closer to parallel while moving it closer increases the rate of foreshortening.

    • If you're having trouble thinking up orientations for your initial 'Y', you may use this tool - https://tasty-tangy-meeting.glitch.me/

    The key things we want to remember from this exercise are that our lines should always converge as a set not in pairs, never diverge from the vanishing point and due to perspective they won't be completely parallel.

    Overall while you did make a few mistakes your boxes are improving so far and with more mileage you'll continue to become more consistent. That being said I'll be marking your submission as complete and move you on to lesson 2.

    Keep practicing previous exercises and boxes as warm ups, feel free to ask any question you have. Good Luck:)

    Next Steps:

    Lesson 2

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete. In order for the student to receive their completion badge, this critique will need 2 agreements from other members of the community.
    2 users agree
    7:43 AM, Sunday February 4th 2024

    Hi CARROR , Congrats!! on finishing lesson, here's the critique;

    LINES

    Good work on being able to successfully connect the starting and ending dots on some of them! Some of the lines may not have landed on the ending dot or have a very slight shakiness or arching, but I can feel some confidence in those line strokes; which is more important here than accuracy.

    ELLIPSE

    Ellipses are a bit wobbly on the ghosted planes. Remember that in ellipses as well as lines you should try to do them as confident as you can, don't hesitate in sacrificing accuracy to get them smoother and more confident.

    BOXES

    You've done a great job and followed instruction pretty well.

    The only drawbacks I see in Organic Perspective is that on some tables, the farther box is bigger than the actual box that is closer in space to the viewer, which can cause some confusion, so do bear in mind the direction and flow of the boxes.

    I believe the 250 boxes challenge should set things right for these problems so as long as your mindful of not repeating them again and take the time to improve.

    I'll mark this as complete and don't forget to ask any question you have:)

    Next Steps:

    250 Box Challenge

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete, and 2 others agree. The student has earned their completion badge for this lesson and should feel confident in moving onto the next lesson.
    7:51 AM, Friday January 12th 2024

    Hi Elodin, It was helpful i'll keep in mind the points you highlighted. Thank you :)

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Sketching: The Basics

Sketching: The Basics

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Sketching: The Basics is a far better choice for beginners. It's more digestible, and while it introduces a lot of similar concepts, it does so in a manner more suited to those earlier in their studies.

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