ConsciousLemon9

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    1:01 PM, Saturday July 11th 2020

    Thanks for the reply. I'll take that into consideration. One more thing, if you wouldn't mind answering - do you think I should draw all of the texture, or just parts of it?

    12:58 PM, Saturday July 11th 2020

    It looks better. Just a note that it would probably look better if you were to apply a gradient to your hatching from dense to sparse. Also, add some line weight to the overlapping edges so that you can better clarify what's in front of what.

    Other than that, good job for completing lesson 2.

    Next Steps:

    Move on to Lesson 3.

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete. In order for the student to receive their completion badge, this critique will need 2 agreements from other members of the community.
    4:00 AM, Saturday July 11th 2020

    So for your arrows, only a few had foreshortening gaps between their edges. I noticed also that some of your arrows had decreasing gaps as they were coming towards you. Make sure that the gaps are getting smaller the further they are away from you. Try not to think of your paper you're drawing on as a flat 2D piece, but rather a "window" to a 3D world. Try to spend more time planning and ghosting.

    For your organic forms, I see a little more variation with your ellipse degrees, although you could push them more if you wanted to. Imagine what would happen if you were to bend your organic forms a bit further. Try to keep your ellipses aligned to the minor axis also.

    Your organic intersections seem like they have improved in terms of them not floating in space. Be mindful of your contour lines - they should reinforce the fact that these forms are rounded, not flat. You've made some of them look nearly straight. Also be mindful of the hook at the ends of the contour lines. You should include them always. Additionally, add line weight only to the parts where the forms overlap one another.

    Next Steps:

    Please complete half a page of arrows.

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    2:24 AM, Tuesday July 7th 2020

    It makes more sense. I'll keep these things into consideration.

    Thanks for your help. I appreciate your time.

    0 users agree
    2:22 AM, Tuesday July 7th 2020

    Hi, Beginner29. Here's my critique for you.

    For the Arrows exercise, you should try to work on getting your perspective correct a bit more. I notice that the gaps between your arrow edges sometimes don't have much foreshortening to them, and neither do your widths of your arrows. Although there may be a small degree of foreshortening, you should try to exaggerate it a little more in order to show more depth. Remember to think of your page as a "window" to a world. Also, don't repeat your lines when you make a mistake. When you add line weight, only apply it to your overlapping edges. Keep your hatching lines tidy too, and straight across the form from side to side instead of diagonal. Keep in mind the curvature of the arrows you've drawn.

    For Organic Forms, some of the instructions have been followed correctly. Just make sure to be aiming for smooth and confident lines - your lines shouldn't be wobbly. Again, don't repeat lines when you make a mistake. That only ends up ruining the flow in your work. You should take your time when planning and ghosting your lines.

    For Texture Analysis, it's helpful to not think of your cast shadows as lines, but instead think of them as shapes. It can be better to draw the outline of those shapes first before you fill it in. In addition, don't scribble when drawing cast shadows either. When you scribble, you tend to rely on randomness or chaos. Instead, look for a rhythm and observe your reference more carefully. I see a few scribbling/hatching lines your third texture drawing, where instead you should have just filled those areas completely in black. This exercise is mainly about choosing effectively which shadows to draw, and that comes from observing things carefully. Also, try to be a bit more mindful of the gradient. Make the transition from dense to sparse more gradual instead of sharp.

    For your dissections, similar ideas for textures apply. The curvature is quite good and you seemed to have taken that into consideration. I do have to say however that you should be more mindful of the light being casted onto the individual forms themselves if you haven't already. Don't draw unnecessary outlines, but instead only draw the resulting shadows. Also, you should add some line weight to the silhouette of your dissected forms.

    For your Form Intersections, I think it's helpful to add some line weight to the silhouette of each form, although I think this part is optional. In addition, you should be sticking to equilateral forms as much as possible. Don't make forms overly stretched in a particular direction. Try to make the length of all sides equal to each other if possible, even for your cylinders. Some of them are overly stretched, and this forces you to think about foreshortening more, distracting you from the main purpose of this exercise (understanding relationships of how forms exist with each other in 3D space). When drawing ellipses, draw through them only two or three times (two is better). Don't draw through them more than that. As well as that, the perspective for your boxes is quite off, as there tends to be an excessive number of parallel and diverging lines. If you haven't already, you practice doing more boxes, and actually getting then critiqued. In the first page of this exercise, you were meant to only draw boxes.

    For your Organic Intersections, think of each form as as actual water balloons, rather than just flat surfaces floating in 3D space. I see some of your forms that look like that they're going to fall off. Avoid this, and try to imagine what would actually happen to these forms in real life if you've placed them there. If they would fall off, then draw them at their resulting position. Don't make overly complex shapes either. Just stick to simple "sausage" forms for the time being. This means keeping each end the same size, and not making the forms taper from one end to another. When you're drawing cast shadows, be mindful of where you are placing them. Make sure it describes the surface it is being cast onto. Some of your cast shadows look like they are floating above the ground, rather than actually being on the ground. Also, some of them do not wrap around the forms they are being casted onto enough. Similar to the organic forms exercise, you should be mindful of the degrees of your contour curves. Try not to keep them the same size and instead follow the principles discussed in the organic forms exercise.

    Next Steps:

    Please submit the following:

    • One page of Arrows

    • One page of Form Intersections (boxes only)

    • One page of Organic Intersections

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    0 users agree
    2:01 AM, Monday July 6th 2020

    Hi, Silviu. Here's my critique for you.

    For the Arrows exercise, you definitely need to work on getting your perspective correct. I notice that the gaps between your arrow eges don't have much foreshortening to them, and neither do your widths of your arrows. Although there may be a small degree of foreshortening, you should try to exaggerate it a little more in order to show more depth. Remember to think of your page as a "window" to a world. Also, don't repeat your lines when you make a mistake. And keep your hatching lines straight rather than curved.

    For Organic Forms, instead of having ellipses of the same degree, you should try to vary them up. When you take an object that's in front of you and you slice it up in parallel segments, your viewing angle of those ellipses are not necessarily going to be the same. If you slice an ellipse directly in front of you, you won't be able to see the face of the slice at all, so the degree of it will be equal to zero. If you slice an ellipse not directly in front of you but on the side, you will see part of the face of the slice, so the degree of it will be greater than zero. If you bend that form more (which you should be doing often), then there will be a greater shift in degrees. Check out this section: https://drawabox.com/lesson/2/5/degree

    For Texture Analysis, try not to think about the outlines too much, and instead think about cast shadows. I think it's more helpful to think more in terms of the small forms of the subject your drawing, and then imaging there is light shining on to it. From there, think about how that form will cast shadow onto its surroundings. When drawing the shadows themselves, don't think of them as lines, but instead think of them as shapes. It's sometimes helpful to draw the outline of those shapes first before you fill it in. Also, try to include more shadow in the parts where the individual forms meet and intersect. In where the forms meet, the shadows will generally be deeper. In your armadillo texture for instance, it seems as if you're just putting a bunch of lines in random places. In addition, don't scribble when drawing cast shadows either. When you scribble, you tend to rely on randomness or chaos. Instead, look for a rhythm and observe your reference more carefully. This exercise is mainly about choosing effectively which shadows to draw, and that comes from observing things carefully.

    For your dissections, similar ideas apply. Think about the small forms themselves - don't treat them as if they are entirely flat surfaces. In this exercise, now you are considering a three-dimensional form to draw on rather than a flat 2D surface. Because of this, you should be mindful of the curvature - in particular, your elephant skin texture. Make sure that the texture warps along the sides. Don't make it flat-looking.

    For your Form Intersections, it is unnecessary to add line weight to the corners. If you do add line weight, I believe you can add it to the silhouette of each form, although I think this part is optional. Also, you can draw hatching lines if you would like to in order to better clarify which forms are what. In additional, you should be sticking to equilateral forms as much as possible. Don't make forms overly stretched in a particular direction. Try to make the length of all sides equal to each other if possible, even for your cylinders. Some of them are overly stretched, and this forces you to think about foreshortening more, distracting you from the main purpose of this exercise (understanding relationships of how forms exist with each other in 3D space). When drawing ellipses, draw through them only two or three times (two is better). Don't draw through them more than that. As well as that, the perspective for your boxes is quite off, as there tends to be an excessive number of parallel and diverging lines. If you haven't already, you should do the 250 Box Challenge. Do this before moving on to the next lessons (get it critiqued too).

    For your Organic Intersections, think of each form as as actual water balloons, rather than just flat surfaces floating in 3D space. I see some of your forms that look like that they're going to fall off. Avoid this, and try to imagine what would actually happen to these forms in real life if you've placed them there. If they would fall off, then draw them at their resulting position. Don't make overly complex shapes either. Just stick to simple "sausage" forms for the time being. This means keeping each end the same size, and not making the forms taper from one end to another. Try to keep your forms of the same size, too. Don't have very small ones and very big ones. When you're drawing cast shadows, be mindful of where you are placing them. Make sure it describes the surface it is being cast onto. In the top image, you're treating some of your cast shadows as if they are being casted onto a wall behind the forms. Instead, imagine there's a ground plane below them and draw your cast shadows on there. I should say, when you add line weight to your forms, apply them to parts of the forms where they overlap one another, in order to show what's in front of what. I would recommend doing this (and drawing your cast shadows) after you've drawn all the forms themselves. Make sure you're drawing from the shoulder, just like how you've been using it in Lesson 1. Your contour lines are sometimes ending up wobbly. Instead, make them smooth and confident.

    As a final note, you may find it helpful to rotate your images on Imgur. You can do this by using the edit option.

    Next Steps:

    Please submit the following:

    • One page of Arrows

    • One page of Organic Forms (contour ellipses)

    • One page of Organic Intersections

    When finished, reply to this critique with your revisions.
    12:39 AM, Monday July 6th 2020

    Thanks for the reply.

    I see now. Although, I would like to clarify a few things if possible. I hope you don't mind answering.

    In the Arrows exercise, we use hatching lines for shading at the bends. I just tried this same technique for leaves, but for some reason, it doesn't end up having much of a sense of believability to it. https://imgur.com/YHa1v3Z

    Also, I know you said in Lesson 3 (and in previous lessons) that we should only be using contour lines when necessary and not to use an excessive number of them. In particular, leaves in real life sometimes have those visible contour lines that aren't misaligned. Would you like us to draw them aligned to each other for the purposes of applying construction (analogous to the symmetrical contour lines in organic forms), or should we draw them based on how they look in real life? https://imgur.com/Ho2K3fq

    In addition, is this what you're talking about when you say not to use excessive contour lines? https://imgur.com/F51LFWn

    If you say that having a bunch of these lines are not necessary, then I'm not sure how else I can simplify it without making it lose its believability of that specific leaf. Is there a specific technique at all that we should use to simplify it effectively?

    5:27 AM, Sunday July 5th 2020

    Thanks very much.

    I'll take that into mind for next time. I appreciate your help.

    5:14 AM, Saturday July 4th 2020

    Alright, so there is a bit of improvement in terms of more convergence instead of parallel lines. Just be careful not to extend your lines in the wrong direction, because I noticed that for a few of your boxes, the extension lines were coming towards the viewer. They should always be going away from the viewer.

    Also, be careful not to have your interior lines diverge. Sometimes they tend to converge, and other times they tend to diverge. You should always aim to get each line to converge as much as possible.

    Next Steps:

    Move on to Lesson 2.

    This community member feels the lesson should be marked as complete. In order for the student to receive their completion badge, this critique will need 2 agreements from other members of the community.
    5:04 AM, Saturday July 4th 2020

    Alright then. Here is my revised version:

    https://imgur.com/a/UMsApub

    So with number 1, I'm a bit confused on why you are saying that adding those pointy bits are wrong when observing, even if they are on the reference. I thought we were supposed to do that.

    As for my revised version, I also have some more questions if you wouldn't mind answering. Are we allowed to use a different pen (both black) when adding line weight and cast shadow? Also, when adding line weight for overlapping forms, should we draw from the shoulder and smoothly? Or does that not matter so much for this exercise?

    Lastly, is it okay to even add line weight and cast shadow after we draw each form, or should that be after we've drawn all forms first?

    I appreciate your time.

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